Thursday, April 20, 2017

English 10 Honors--4/25/2017 DRAFT

Jump Off
--Pick up a copy MONOMYTH

S. the C.
--agenda/HW
--oral reading of assignment sheet/Q & A

Transition
--venture down to the Computer Lab

Flex Time -- Membean Training and/or Monomyth

HW



  • Computer Lab for Membean training and Monomyth Writing Assignment work time

English 9--4/24/2017 & 4/25/2017

Jump Off (15-25 mins.)
--Pick up your copy of Veronica Roth's Divergent.  The books are in stacks by class block in the front of the classroom.  Find the book with your name Post-ited to the front cover.
--Pick up a copy of the persuasive essay titled "Modernize the School Calendar" from the front table.  Back at your desk, read the text quietly and independently.  Annotate by completing the following purposeful reading tasks (which are aligned with a portion of your English 9 Final Examination!):

  • Underline the writer's main claim.  In other words, find the sentence or sentences in the text that state(s) what the author of the essay is ultimately trying to argue.
  • Highlight or circle one specific detail that the author uses in support of his/her argument.
Next, read the text a second time.  Annotate by completing the following purposeful reading task (which also aligns with a portion of your English 9 Final Examination!):
  • Box all of the bolded words.
  • Pick five of the words--"guess" the meaning of each of the words via context clues, writing an appropriate synonym or definition right on your copy of the text near the word itself.
  • WE HAVE DONE THIS BEFORE! :)
*AS YOU WORK, YOUR LAST TWO THE TRAGEDY OF ROMEO AND JULIET UNIT ASSESSMENTS WILL BE RETURNED.  WHEN YOU FINISH THE SKILLS WORK RELATED TO "MODERNIZE THE SCHOOL CALENDAR", SPEND SOME TIME LOOKING THROUGH YOUR ASSESSMENTS IN ORDER TO DEEPEN YOUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE PLAY.  (FOR EXAMPLE, IF YOU WERE UNABLE TO ACCURATELY IDENTIFY THE LINES INCLUDED AS #19 ON THE SECOND ASSESSMENT, USE YOUR PARSONS TEXT.  DOING SO WILL ALLOW YOU TO SEE THAT ROMEO SPEAKS THESE LINES, HIGHLIGHTING THE EXTENT TO WHICH HE ALREADY BELIEVES HIS LIFE REVOLVES AROUND JULIET.)  REMEMBER THAT IN ORDER TO SUCCESSFULLY WRITE YOUR END-OF-UNIT ESSAY, YOU MUST FULLY UNDERSTAND THE PLAY.  USING YOUR ASSESSMENTS AS LEARNING TOOLS OUGHT TO HELP!*

S. the C. (8-10 mins.)
--go over the author's claim and related evidence in "Modernize the School Calendar"
--agenda/HW


Instruction -- Vocabulary Unit #6 (10-15 mins.)
--go over the Unit #6 word list (pages 72-74)--read word aloud, have students repeat the word, and then read the part(s) of speech/definition(s)/sample sentence(s)--repeat this process for the entire list

In order to actively engage, students should be:

a.) writing the words on the lines for each of the sentences

b.) comparing actual definitions to "guesses" made using prior knowledge/context clues during the "Jump Off"--how did you do?!

c.) putting a line through words already mastered and a star next to "foreign" words (those that will definitely need to be studied).

Transition (2 mins.)
--Return your The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet Unit assessments by placing them in the black basket on the front table.  While you are up there, pick up a copy of the "End-of-Unit Essay--Procedures List #1" with sample work included upon it.
--Take out your copies of the following documents:
  • "The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet End-of-Unit Essay" document (assignment sheet)
  • "End-of-Unit Essay--Procedures List #1" 
Writing Workshop -- The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet End-of-Unit Essay (20 mins.)
--quiet and independent work time--aim to complete as much of Procedures 1-4 as possible in the time permitted
  • If you are unsure of what to do, please look at the document that you just picked up from the front table.  My hope is that looking at this model for the sample essay upon which I am working will help you better understand what I expect/need you to do during this chunk of class time!

Differentiated Work Block (remainder of the class block)
--during this time, students have the following options:
  • continuing to work quietly and independently on essay procedures
  • reading pages 1-26 of Veronica Roth's Divergent bearing in mind that next class, a "Did You Read?" assessment will take place
HW (Class Preparation)

--Begin preparing for the Unit #6 vocabulary quiz, which will take place this Friday, 4/28 (ACE)/next Monday, 5/1 (BDF).  You might want to consider completing each of the exercises in the vocabulary book.  REMEMBER THAT WORDS FROM PREVIOUS UNITS ARE "FAIR GAME" ON ANY VOCABULARY QUIZ THEREAFTER!
--Bring your vocabulary book to class again next time.  PLEASE DO NOT FORGET!
--"Gist" read up to the end of CHAPTER THREE of Divergent (pg. 26).  This might include completing one or both of the following tasks: 

  • asking yourself the "Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How" questions every five pages and jotting down related notes on lined paper
  • jotting down notes on Post-its related to important characters, plot events, contrasts and contradictions, etc. and sticking the Post-its to the corresponding pages in the book

--Though you are not required to do anything other than read the first 26 pages of Divergent--you do not have to take notes--, a "Did You Read?" assessment consisting of six questions will occur at the beginning of class next time (Wednesday, 4/26 [ACE] or Thursday, 4/27 [BDF]).  If you have completed a successful "gist" reading, said assessment should not be challenging at all! :)
--Aim to read at least 5-10 pages of your free reading book between now and next class  if time permits you to do so.  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS!

HW (Class Preparation/Writing)
--Continue progressing through your essay-writing process in whatever manner you see fit.  (If you have not already done so, it would be in your best interest to finish compiling evidence.  If you fail to do so, you will find yourself behind in the writing process.)  The final version of your essay (your absolute best effort) is tentatively due at the beginning of class on Thursday, 5/4 (ACE) or Friday, 5/5 (BDF).

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

English 10 Honors--4/21/2017

Jump Off
--Pick up a copy of the "Preparation for Final Discussion" document from the front table.  We will spend the first 15 minutes of class preparing for today's circle discussion via this document.  (For the last 5 or so minutes of this block of time, feel free to work with others [e.g., wrap up your preliminary work about the monomyth from last class in your small group, share a few of your ideas with a partner, etc.])

S. the C.
--If you have not already done so, make sure to follow through with grammar hammer reassessment arrangements.
--agenda/HW
--preview of next class block

Transition
--We are going to form today's circle alphabetically by the names of our pets.  If you only have one pet, great!  What is his or her name?  If you have multiple pets, pick one.  What is his or her name?  If, like me, you do not currently have a pet, consider one of the following options:
  • Have you had pets in the past?  If so, pick one of those names (e.g., My first cat's name was Ric.)
  • If you herded sheep for a living like Santiago initially did, what would you name your favorite sheep?  (Casper? Santiago? Snowball?  Whatever!) 
--Form a circle out of the desks.

Circle Discussion (Novella Closure) -- The Alchemist up to the End
Definite items for discussion:
  • First, we will finish sharing information gathered/conclusions drawn regarding allusions (a continuation of two classes ago).
  • Then, we will apply the monomyth template to The Alchemist and address the "so what?!" question, potentially connecting the novella to our own lives (a continuation of last class).

Potential items for the remainder of discussion:
  • Active/purposeful reading notes
  • Paulo Coelho "writing what he knows"--applying author background to The Alchemist
  • What is magical realism?  What are magical realist authors "up to"?
    • How does Coelho's The Alchemist "fit the magical realism bill", so to speak?
  • Application of new terms/concepts (e.g., dilemma, fable, foil) to the novella
    • For example, you might attempt to answer this question: What characters in the novella serve as foils to each other? How so? What is Coelho's potential purpose?
  • What is Paulo Coelho's "thesis" about human nature as per the story he tells?
    • If Coelho were to sit down and have a conversation with William Golding, how would it "play out"?  Who would argue what?  How would each counter?
    • If Coelho were to sit down and have a conversation with George Orwell, how would it "play out"?  Who would argue what?  How would each counter?

--engage in discussion as per the protocol--contributions will be assessed via the "Discussion Contribution Rating Scale"

Transition
--Re-column the desks and pick up an index card from the front table.

Closure -- "Today, I learned/realized/concluded that..."


      • You must include a properly punctuated nonrestrictive element within your writing.  Good luck!

      DEAR (time permitting)



      HW (Practice/Take-Home Assessment)

      --Complete 45 minutes of Membean training as directed before 11:59 PM on Thursday, 4/27.  If you fail to appropriately train between now and the administration of Vocabulary Quiz #6, you will not be permitted to take the quiz until you catch up (see the "Membean Routine" document).
      HW (Class Preparation)
      --Remember that I reserve the right to conduct a reading assessment at any time. It would be in your best interest to continuously review your reading notes for The Alchemist and any related materials. Remember, too, that you are expected to both understand and apply your understandings of certain terms/concepts to your reading of the novella (in addition to the typical terms/concepts such as setting, symbolism, theme, etc.): allegory, allusion, aphorism, Christ(ological) figure, Coelho's "Four Obstacles" Philosophy, dilemma, everyman, fable, foil, genre, geography, interior monologue, leitmotif, literary blindness, literary communion, literary vampire, magical realism, marked for greatness, monomyth (hero's journey), motif, myth, paradox, and quest. A sample assessment question/prompt, then, might look like the following:
      • How is Paulo Coelho's novella The Alchemist a blending of several literary modes/genres? Consider using any or all of the following terms in your response: genre, allegory, fable, and magical realism. What is one likely purpose Coelho was looking to fulfill when he decided to tell such a story?
      --Aim to read at least 5-10 pages of your free reading book between now and next class.  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS!
      --Begin thinking about your personal narrative--what story will you tell about your own life that demonstrates the universality of Joseph Campbell's monomyth?
      --Work on the End-of-Course Assignment--you do not want to wait too long to get started on this!

      On the backburner:
      • Paraphrasing Mini-Lesson as preparation for culminating assignment (based on observations while assessing the "Reading Nonfiction Document"s)
      • ACT nonfiction passages and multiple choice questions
      • "Madness" done in class upon submission of revisions

      English 9--4/20/2017 & 4/21/2017

      Jump Off (1-2 mins.)
      --Please get back into your Romeo and Juliet large groups from the end of last class block and wait patiently for further directions!
      --The following students must SEE ME before leaving class today:
      • Shawn D.
      • Leah E.
      • Ryan H.
      • Carter P.--stayed 4/19 and 4/20--not turned in
      • Storme S.
      S. the C. (10-20 mins.)
      --Reminder: It is important for you to stay caught up with regard to all of your coursework.  It is in your best interest to check the blog and SchoolTool often.  Additionally, if you have an "INC" for a Marking Period, following up with me ASAP would be wise!
      --agenda/HW
      --directions given for debate (SEE BELOW) and for finishing Step #2 from last class block:
      • finish forming your argument/counterargument and assign spokespeople (three total--consider who worked with which folder initially)

      --finish Step #2 from last class block (5-10 mins.) (MORE TIME NEEDED IN BLOCK 4)

      Transition (3-5 mins.)
      --Form a large circle consisting of 17 desks and a smaller inner circle consisting of 8 desks--I'LL DRAW A PICTURE ON THE BOARD IF I NEED TO!

      Activity (cont.) -- Debate Circle (20-ish mins.)

      Step #3: The Debate
      • purpose of desks explained: 6 desks in the inner circle are for spokespeople to share their views while the 7th desk and the 8th desk in the inner circle are designated for anyone who wants to come in briefly and add information to the debate (advisement for spokespeople, clearer explanations, direct quotations, etc.) after which he or she must go back to his or her desk in the outer circle
      • spokespeople move to inner circle desks to prepare for debating about the following question:
        • Who is more impulsive throughout Act IV and Act V of The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, Romeo or Juliet?
      • begin debating with a spokesperson from Romeo's "camp" (timer at 45 seconds)--I'll moderate, moving from "camp" to "camp" and including the "7th and 8th deskers" whenever appropriate
      • during the debate, outer circle members are to be silent until all the spokespeople in the inner circle have been heard (unless, of course, an outer circle member chooses to take the 7th or 8th desk)--taking notes during the debate is highly encouraged! :)
      • after the spokespeople in the inner circle have debated the topic, outer circle members can direct questions to individual spokespeople (time permitting)
      Transition (1-2 mins.)
      --Re-column the desks and...
      • Block 4 BDF: pick up a copy of the "Collaboration Reflection/End-of-Unit Essay Ticket-Out-the-Door" document
      • Block 1 ACE, Block 2 ACE, and Block 3 BDF: take out your copy of the "Collaboration Reflection/End-of-Unit Essay Ticket-Out-the-Door" document
      Looking Ahead/Closure (5-15 mins.)
      --Block 1 ACE, Block 2 ACE, and Block 3 BDF: after carefully reading the directions on the back of the Ticket-Out-the-Door, complete the task at hand and submit your best work based on the time permitted
      --Block 4 BDF: after carefully reading the directions on the Ticket-Out-the-Door, complete the tasks at hand and submit your best work based on the time permitted

      Transition (1-2 mins.)
      --Turn in your T-O-D and pick up a copy of the "End-of-Unit Essay--Procedures List #1" document from the front table.
      --Take out your copy of the "The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet End-of-Unit Essay" document.

      Writing Workshop -- The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet End-of-Unit Essay (15-25 mins.)
      *THROUGHOUT THE COURSE OF THE WRITING PROCESS, I WILL MODEL WITH THE FOLLOWING ESSAY QUESTION:
      • WHO IS A BETTER FRIEND TO ROMEO, BENVOLIO OR MERCUTIO?  SO WHAT?!*
      --oral reading of assignment sheet/Q & A
      --purposeful oral reading of the first step/Q & A
      --quiet and independent work time
      --brief share-out via a drawing of cards
      --process repeated for remaining steps

      Transition (1-2 mins.)
      --Pick up an index card from the front table and write your name at the top of the lined side of the card.

      Closure (last 3 mins. of class)
      --On your index card, write the thesis statement for your essay as it currently stands.  Please do your best work so that I can do my best work in order to aid you!

      HW (Class Preparation)
      --Bring your vocabulary book to class next time.  PLEASE DO NOT FORGET!

      --Continue progressing through your essay-writing process in whatever manner you see fit.  (It would be in your best interest to finish compiling evidence.)  The final version of your essay (your absolute best effort) is tentatively due at the beginning of class on Thursday, 5/4 (ACE) or Friday, 5/5 (BDF).
      --Aim to read at least 5-10 pages of your free reading book between now and next class (especially with the knowledge that we will be delving into Divergent very soon).  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS!

      On the backburner:


        • A Paragraph's a Paragraph's a Paragraph instruction (if necessary)
        • Break down model paragraph together (if necessary)

        Monday, April 17, 2017

        English 10 Honors--4/19/2017

        Jump Off (8-10 mins.)
        --Even though you just came in the door, pick up a copy of the document titled "The Literary Quest--Ticket-Out-the-Door".  Spend the first 8-10 minutes of class completing the document quietly and independently.  Be prepared to engage in a brief follow-up discussion intended to warm us up for the remainder of today's class block.

        --AS YOU WORK, I WILL BE AROUND TO RETURN THE FOLLOWING:
            • YOUR "THE ALCHEMIST UP TO PAGE 104--READING FOR DETAILS QUIZ"
            • YOUR "QUIZ--RESTRICTIVE VS. NON-RESTRICTIVE ELEMENTS"


            S. the C. (20-25 mins.)
            --please SEE ME during homeroom today if you earned a score of 70% or lower on the grammar assessment and/or if you want to reassess
            --agenda/HW
            --briefly discuss the Jump Off via a drawing of cards
            • application of quest elements to The Alchemist
            • application of quest elements to our lives
            --What do you already know about Joseph Campbell's monomyth?  (From sixth grade?  From your work defining terms/concepts at the start of the school year?  From your application of the concept to Lord of the Flies and/or The Alchemist?)
            --view TEDEd video titled "What Makes a Hero?" for the gist--be ready to share out once we've finished viewing the video:
            --share out via a drawing of cards--create a bulleted list on the front board of items that resonated when viewing for the gist

            Transition (2 mins.)
            --Return your quizzes by placing them in the black basket on the front table.
            --Pick up a copy of the "Joseph Campbell's Monomyth--Background, Instruction, and Application" document from the front table.

            Application Activity & Discussion/Discussion Preparation (Novella Closure) -- Joseph Campbell's Monomyth (flex time)
            --oral active/purposeful reading of two discussion questions and page one of the document
            --pair work--responding to discussion questions on page two of the document
            --oral reading of directions on page three of the document
            --independent active/purposeful reading of the 17 stages of Joseph Campbell's monomyth on page three of the document
            --oral reading of directions and exemplary response on page four of the document
            --eight groups formed via a drawing of cards (Refusal of Call & Supernatural Aid...Master of Two Worlds & Freedom to Live) so that we can "divide and conquer"
            --"anchor in" to the "Compact for Group Work" via the poster located in the front of the classroom and work on applying the monomyth template to The Alchemist as preparation for discussion

            Transition (1 min.)
            --Pick up an index card from the front table.

            Closure -- "Today, I learned..." (remainder of class)
                      • You must include a properly punctuated nonrestrictive element within your writing.  Good luck!
                      DEAR (time permitting)

                      HW (Class Preparation)
                      --FYI: Next class, we will engage in discussion about both allusions in and Joseph Campbell's monomyth applied to The Alchemist.
                      --Remember that I reserve the right to conduct a reading assessment at any time. It would be in your best interest to continuously review your reading notes for The Alchemist and any related materials. Remember, too, that you are expected to both understand and apply your understandings of certain terms/concepts to your reading of the novella (in addition to the typical terms/concepts such as setting, symbolism, theme, etc.): allegory, allusion, aphorism, Christ(ological) figure, Coelho's "Four Obstacles" Philosophy, dilemma, everyman, fable, foil, genre, geography, interior monologue, leitmotif, literary blindness, literary communion, literary vampire, magical realism, marked for greatness, monomyth (hero's journey), motif, myth, paradox, and quest. A sample assessment question/prompt, then, might look like the following:
                      • How is Paulo Coelho's novella The Alchemist a blending of several literary modes/genres? Consider using any or all of the following terms in your response: genre, allegory, fable, and magical realism. What is one likely purpose Coelho was looking to fulfill when he decided to tell such a story?
                      --Aim to read at least 5-10 pages of your free reading book between now and next class.  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS!
                      --Work on the End-of-Course Assignment--you do not want to wait too long to get started on this!

                      On the backburner:
                      • Paraphrasing Mini-Lesson as preparation for culminating assignment (based on observations while assessing the "Reading Nonfiction Document"s)
                      • ACT nonfiction passages and multiple choice questions
                      • "Madness" done in class upon submission of revisions




                        English 9--4/18/2017 & 4/19/2017

                        Jump Off #1 (8 mins.)
                        --If your Article of the Week #6 is not currently your best work, I really do not want to look at it!  In fact, the first 8 minutes of class today are yours to do the following quietly and independently:
                        • improve your Article of the Week #6 work before turning in the document
                        • read your free reading book
                        • read Upfront newsmagazine if you do not have your book or if you prefer to do so
                        Jump Off #2 (1-2 mins.)
                        --Submit your best work for Article of the Week #6 by placing your document in the black basket on the front table.  Please bear in mind the Room 203 policies surrounding missing/incomplete work about which I will remind you in a few minutes.
                        --FYI: There will not be an Act IV/Act V assessment for The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet as much of what I am aiming to assess moving forward will be addressed within the End-of-Unit Essay.

                        S. the C. (10-12 mins.)
                        --Reminder: The following Room 203 policies are in place as per the "Important Information" document reviewed at the start of the school year":
                        • When a take-home assessment for collection (e.g., the active/purposeful reading component of AoW #6) is not turned in on time or not entirely completed, you will not receive credit and must come in for homeroom detention either the same day (Block 1 classes) or the following day, a block of time during which you are expected to wrap up your work.  Failure to stay for homeroom will result in a referral for central detention.  You will not receive full credit for a take-home assessment turned in late.  At best, your efforts will earn you an ineffective score of 64%.
                        • If you do not have a writing piece (e.g., the “Writing Skills Practice” section of AoW #6) completed and turned in on time, you will be required to come in after school with me to work on completing the assignment and, depending on my schedule, receive assistance.  (The exception here would be if you have already stayed for homeroom and completed and turned in the assignment.)  I expect you to continue coming in after school until the assignment is completed and turned in.  As with homework assignments, failure to stay with me will result in central detention(s).  Writing pieces will be marked 10% off per day late.
                        --Reminder: It is important for you to stay caught up with regard to all of your coursework.  It is in your best interest to check the blog and SchoolTool often.  Additionally, if you have an "INC" for a Marking Period, following up with me ASAP would be wise!
                        --Reminder: Beginning with the end in mind--our ultimate purpose when dealing with The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet (especially when closely re-reading sections of the play, as we will do during today's class block):


                        ROUGH End-of-Unit Assessment Writing Prompt:
                        Write a multi-paragraph essay in which you argue the extent to which both Romeo and Juliet are fatally impulsive by analyzing their responses to similar circumstances.  Then, answer the "so what" question: Why did Shakespeare develop his two main characters in this manner?


                        --agenda/HW

                        Activity -- Debate Circle

                        Step #1: Debate Preparation--Phase One (30-35 mins.)
                        • What do I mean when I say, "Think like a trial lawyer!"?
                        • task modeled with a "folder" about Act I (if necessary--SEE POWERPOINT)
                        • Q & A--I did this activity for the first time last school year, so you need to help me be clear! :)
                        • groups formed via a drawing of cards
                        • folders distributed
                        • group work time "anchored in" to our "Compact for Group Work" (10-20 mins.)
                          • share rubric used during closure for further "anchoring in" (SEE SAMPOWERPOINT)
                        Step #2: Debate Preparation--Phase Two (5-10 mins.)
                        • larger groups formed (Juliet group and Romeo group)
                        • share work completed, finish forming your argument/counterargument, and assign spokespeople (three total--consider who worked with which folder initially)
                        Transition -- form a large circle consisting of 17 desks and a smaller inner circle consisting of 8 desks--I'LL DRAW A PICTURE ON THE BOARD IF I NEED TO! (3-5 mins.)

                        Step #3: The Debate (time permitting)
                        • purpose of desks explained: 6 desks in the inner circle are for spokespeople to share their views while the 7th desk and the 8th desk in the inner circle are designated for anyone who wants to come in briefly and add information to the debate (advisement for spokespeople, clearer explanations, direct quotations, etc.) after which he or she must go back to his or her desk in the outer circle
                        • spokespeople move to inner circle desks to prepare for debating about the following question:
                          • Who is more impulsive throughout Act IV and Act V of The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, Romeo or Juliet?
                        • begin debating with a spokesperson from Romeo's "camp" (timer at 45 seconds)--I'll moderate, moving from "camp" to "camp" and including the "7th and 8th deskers" whenever appropriate
                        • during the debate, outer circle members are to be silent until all the spokespeople in the inner circle have been heard (unless, of course, an outer circle member chooses to take the 7th or 8th desk)--taking notes during the debate is highly encouraged! :)
                        • after the spokespeople in the inner circle have debated the topic, outer circle members can direct questions to individual spokespeople (time permitting)
                        Transition (1-2 mins.)
                        --Re-column the desks and pick up a copy of each of the following documents:
                        • "The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet End-0f-Unit Essay"
                        • "Collaboration Reflection/End-of-Unit Essay Ticket-Out-the-Door"
                        Looking Ahead/Closure (remainder of class)
                        --oral reading of assignment sheet/Q & A
                        --After carefully reading the directions on the front page of the Ticket-Out-the-Door, complete the task at hand and place your best work in your binder prior to leaving class.  (We will return to this document next class.)

                        HW (Class Preparation)
                        --Continue thinking about and preparing for the End-0f-Unit Essay.
                        --Aim to read at least 5-10 pages of your free reading book between now and next class (especially with the knowledge that we will be delving into Divergent very soon).  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS!

                        On the backburner:

                        • A Paragraph's a Paragraph's a Paragraph instruction (if necessary)
                        • Break down model paragraph together (if necessary)