Friday, December 8, 2017

English 10 Honors--12/13/2017 & 12/14/2017 DRAFT

Transition (time permitting)
--Please re-column the desks and pick up the following items from the front table:
  • a good-smelling marker or two
  • a sheet of computer paper
Closure Preparation/Looking Ahead (time permitting)
--First, take down your poster currently hung on the greenboard.  Then, open up your notebook to a clean sheet of paper.  Date the page (12/11/2017 [ACE] or 12/12/2017 [BDF]) and label this section of your notes "My Current Answer to the Essential 'Question'".  Then, thoughtfully respond to the following questions:
  • What is your current answer to the Essential "Question" that overarches our course?  (Here are the related questions: Why do people say what they say, do what they do, etc.?  What are human beings really like?  By nature, are human beings inherently evil or good or...?)  After some thought--I encourage you to look through any notes you have taken over the course of the past few weeks during our work with Animal Farm--, write your updated claim about human nature in your notebook.  Re-read and revise your claim as necessary; then, write your claim neatly in marker on your sheet of computer paper.  (Please note that if time permits, you will be invited to share your claim with me and the rest of the class! :) ) 
Closure -- Ball Toss (time permitting)
  • What is your claim?
  • What do you find yourself thinking about, picturing, etc. as your claim continues coming together in your mind?
  • How might you support your claim?
  • What would naysayers say?


CLIPS/ARTICLES (MOORE, TAX PLAN)


AoW

  • old back
  • new assigned


--Squealer analysis (end of Ch. 3)

· methods of manipulation

· present in current politics?

Transition--Pick up one of each of the following documents from the front table:

· "Propaganda/Some Types of Propaganda"

· "Defining Propaganda II"

After reading the first set of directions on the "Propaganda/Some Types of Propaganda" sheet, engage in purposeful reading until I ask you to stop.

Instructional Activity -- Animal Farm Unit--Propaganda/Some Types of Propaganda

--Following this activity, you should be able to...

· roughly define the term propaganda

· define, provide examples of, and begin to recognize each of the provided types of propaganda

--either independently or in pairs, finish reading "Defining Propaganda II" and craft a definition of propaganda
--whole-class share-out
--oral reading of the second set of directions/Q & A
--continue working independently or in pairs in order to fill in the blanks under each provided type of propaganda
--whole-class share-out

Application Activity
 -- Recognizing Propaganda in Current Affairs/Political Commentary Shows
--view the first five minutes of the opening monologue of the following clip in order to answer these questions: 

· What types of propaganda are being used?  How so?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cqhWyUOMdo

--pair/share

--repeat this process for the first five minutes of the following clip:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gzFyHesYsN4


Transition
--Pick up an index card from the front table.  Write your name at the top of the lined side of the card.  Then, respond to the key question driving the preceding activities:

· How might recognizing and understanding different types of propaganda impact important decisions that you make in the future?

--When you finish, leave your index card on your desk.

English 9--12/13/2017 & 12/14/2017 DRAFT

--Please SEE ME before leaving class today:
  • Michael B.
  • Robert S.
AOW #3 RETURNED--AOW #4 UP AND DONE TOGETHER (PARAGRAPH-WRITING TRAINING IN PREPARATION FOR END-OF-UNIT WRITING ASSESSMENT FOR "ST. LUCY'S...")

Thursday, December 7, 2017

English 10 Honors--12/11/2017 & 12/12/2017

Jump Off (3-5 mins.)
--Please pick up a copy of the "Writing an Academic Argument" sheet from the front table.  Then, back at your desk, do the following:
  • Place your free reading book for Marking Period 3 and Marking Period 4 on the floor next to your desk so that I can easily access it in order to write down the title.
  • Purposefully read the "Writing an Academic Argument" sheet.  What questions can I answer before you begin working in earnest on "Task #1"?
--Please SEE ME before leaving class today:

  • Ian W.

S. the C. #1 (3-5 mins.)
--quick Q & A/MODELING before working quietly and independently on "Task #1" of the "Writing an Academic Argument" sheet

Think -- Writing an Academic Argument (10 mins.)
--complete "Task #1" quietly and independently

S. the C. #2 (8-10 mins.)
--4 ACE: Mrs. McMahon introduction
--rationale behind today's lesson
--Beginning with the end in mind:

End-of-Unit Assessment Writing Prompt:

Write a text-based, grammatically sound, tightly-written response of two to three paragraphs.  In your response, respond to the following question so as to reveal a theme statement (central idea) of Animal FarmWhat is George Orwell's "thesis" about human nature as revealed in the story he tells?  Then, analyze how Orwell's use of symbolism helps develop his "thesis" about human nature.  Use at least three pieces of strong textual evidence spanning the entire text to support your analysis, and be sure to tie back to your claim often.


--You should leave class today...
  • having moved forward with regard to your ability to write an academic argument (what to include, how to organize, etc.)
    • Your ability to write an academic argument will be assessed via the take-home assessment under the "Writing" heading.
  • with a rough plan in place for moving forward as an active/purposeful reader of informational text
    • Your ability to actively/purposefully read informational text will be assessed as part of Article of the Week #2.
  • with a deeper understanding of and appreciation for the importance of source awareness/credibility.

--You might leave class today...

  • with a rough meaningful and complex theme statement for George Orwell's Animal Farm.
    • The quality of your theme statement will be assessed as a component of the "End-of-Unit Assessment" writing piece.

    --agenda/HW

    Pair -- Writing an Academic Argument (10-15 mins.)
    --"anchor in" to our "Compact for Group Work"
    --share progress with each other in preparation for a whole-class share-out in which we outline/begin writing the argument together
    --continue working on "Task #1"

    Transition (1-2 mins.)
    --Form a horseshoe out of the desks in front of the southside of the front board.

    Share/Instruction/Note-taking -- Writing an Academic Argument (until 10 mins. remaining in class)
    --outline/begin writing argument together on the front board (PICK BACK UP HERE BY SHARING MATERIALS FOR METHOD A AND METHOD B)
    • During this portion of class, please complete "Task #2" on the back of your "Writing an Academic Argument" sheet.
    --Closure -- T-P-S
    • Thematically, what do you think that George Orwell is ultimately suggesting?
    Old Business/Application Activity/HW Time -- Article of the Week #1
    --take a look at sample student work via SMART Notebook:
    • highlighter analysis explained
    • applauding reader for picking up on sensationalism
    --Transition
    • Pick up your copy of Article of the Week #1 from the front table.
    --look back through your active/purposeful reading of Article of the Week #1
    • What are my "GROWS" for AoW #2?
    --re-read your argument writing piece, bearing in mind today's "Writing an Academic Argument" work
    • How can I strengthen this argument?
    --quietly and independently work on the take-home assessment due next class

    HW (Practice/Take-Home Assessment/Class Preparation)
    --Complete a total of 45 minutes of Membean training as directed before 11:59 PM on Thursday, 12/14.  If you fail to appropriately train between now and the administration of Vocabulary Quiz #4, you will not be permitted to take the quiz until you catch up (see the "Membean Routine" document).
    HW (Class Preparation)
    --Read at least 10 pages of your free reading book between now and next class.  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS!  
    • "There is no such thing as a child who hates to read; there are only children who have not found the right book" (Frank Serafini, author of The Reading Workshop)

    Writing
    --Using your Article of the Week #1 argumentative writing piece as a starting point and bearing in mind today's "Writing an Academic Argument" work, type in MLA format a two-paragraph argument of no more than 750 words in response to the following question: Should we (Mr. and Mrs. Martin) or should we not buy our oldest son, six-year-old Caleb, a tablet for Christmas this year?  When scoring and/or providing growth-oriented feedback upon your written work, I will have the following framework in mind:

    Page 3 of this link: http://www.nysedregents.org/hsela/115/hsela12015-rgb.pdf

    English 9--12/11/2017 & 12/12/2017

    Jump Off
    --Please re-form your "packs" from last class block and give me your undivided attention as soon as I finish inputting attendance.
    --Please SEE ME before leaving class today:
    • Abigail F.
    • Becca L.
    S. the C.
    --You should leave class today...
    • with a clearer sense of how to read literature purposefully--when annotating, what should I be writing?!
    • much more deeply understanding Stage 4 of "St. Lucy's..." (and, as such, more deeply understanding the entire story)
    • having re-read and briefly discussed Stage 5 of "St. Lucy's..." (and, as such, more deeply understanding the entire story)
    • with "PROS" and "GROWS" captured for your "Standards Assessment--Summary Writing" piece for Stage 5 of "St. Lucy's..."
    • with a meaningful and complex theme statement for "St. Lucy's..." both written and revised as per peer feedback
    • a copy of a document in your possession for use when planning your "End-of-Mini-Unit Assessment" writing piece
    • with your "End-of-Mini-Unit Assessment" writing piece partially roughly outlined.
    --beginning with the end in mind--our ultimate purpose for re-reading the short story:

    End-of-Mini-Unit Assessment Writing Prompt:
    Write a well-developed paragraph in which you support a meaningful and complex theme statement for Karen Russell's "St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves."  Use at least three pieces of strong textual evidence spanning the entire text, and be sure to tie back to your theme statement often.


    --agenda/HW

    Comprehension Check/Whole-Class Discussion (cont.) -- "Stage 4 Comprehension and Purposeful Reading Quiz"
    --Reminder: directions:
    • quietly come to consensus for each multiple choice question--reveal response upon hearing the word "reveal"
    • following each question, we will discuss correct/incorrect responses and continue marking up the text
    Transition
    --re-column the desks

    Review/Writing Workshop -- Stage 5 of "St. Lucy's..."/Summary Writing
    --as I re-read aloud Stage 5 of "St. Lucy's..." followed by reading aloud the Stage 5 summary below, please consider the following:

    • How does the denouement of the story (Stage 5) link to the climax/falling action of the story (Stage 4)?  Think about the work that we just did with Stage 4!

    Sample Highly-Effective Stage 5 Summary
              Stage 5 of Karen Russell's short story "St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves" is about the narrator Claudette going back to her family's cave.  Claudette, who feels somber, needs help from a woodsman to find her way back to the cave.  Upon arrival, Claudette's family members are feasting on a large animal together and initially do not seem to recognize Claudette.  After sniffing Claudette for a long time and biting her, Claudette's mother recognizes Claudette but looks pleased and sorrowful at the same time.  The scene concludes when Claudette lies to her family members by telling them that she is "home".

    --briefly discuss the question from the bulleted list above
    --Transition
    • procure your Cumulative Writing Portfolio from the front table
    --self-reflection process MODELED (rubric analysis, re-reading summary/capturing feedback)
    --quiet and independent self-reflection time
    • Bearing in mind the summary above and the feedback provided on your rubric and assessment, what is one strength ("PRO") you demonstrated?  What is one area for growth ("GROW")?
      • write down "PROS" and "GROWS" in your Cumulative Writing Portfolio

    --brief Q & A


    Transition
    --Pick up both of the following from the front table:
    • the "Writing a Meaningful and Complex Theme Statement" halfsheet
    • the "Rough Outline for Writing a Paragraph" sheet

    Writing Workshop -- End-of-Mini-Unit Assessment Writing Piece

    --oral reading of "Writing a Meaningful and Complex Theme Statement" halfsheet
    • What materials do you have in your possession that can help you successfully complete this task?
    • Consider this: A truly meaningful and complex theme statement often includes more than one theme word.
    • Q & A
    --quiet and independent work time
    --Transition
    • If you have not already done so, take out your copy of the "Theme Statements--The Do Nots/The Dos" sheet.
    • Switch your theme statement with your partner (as per drawing of cards).
    --providing feedback process MODELED
    --after "anchoring in" to our "Compact for Group Work", help each other revise theme statements
    --after putting the desks back in columns, "break down" the "Rough Outline for Writing a Paragraph" sheet together as per the assignment upon which we are currently working

    HW Time
    --work on roughly outlining your "End-of-Mini-Unit Assessment" writing piece


    HW (Class Preparation)
    --Roughly outline your "End-of-Mini-Unit Assessment" writing piece using the "Rough Outline for Writing a Paragraph" sheet.  You should come to class next time with your theme statement more or less perfected and all of your pieces of evidence gathered and written down.
    --Read at least 10 pages of your free reading book between now and next class.  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS!  
    • "There is no such thing as a child who hates to read; there are only children who have not found the right book" (Frank Serafini, author of The Reading Workshop).

    Monday, December 4, 2017

    English 10 Honors--12/7/2017 & 12/8/2017

    Jump Off
    --Please place your evidence of having thoroughly completed either the "Orwell's Allegory and the United States of America--Supporting an Argument" or the "Orwell's Allegory and the United States of America--Writing a Counterargument (Method #1)" on the floor next to your desk.  Then, attend to the rest of this "Jump Off" as I check your work prior to today's discussion activities.  If you finish the "Jump Off" before I finish passing through, take out your free reading book or pick up a copy of Upfront and read until I have finished.
    --I would like to remind you of the following passage from Chapter 3 of George Orwell's Animal Farm.  This passage exists after the animals realize that the pigs have been taking the milk for themselves and also taking all of the extra apples:

    "Squealer was sent to make the necessary explanations to the others.

         'Comrades!' he cried.  'You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in a spirit of selfishness and privilege?  Many of us actually dislike milk and apples.  I dislike them myself.  Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health.  Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain substances absolutely  necessary to the well-being of a pig.  We pigs are brainworkers.  The whole management and organization of this farm depend on us.  Day and night we are watching over your welfare.  It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples.  Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty?  Jones would come back!  Surely, comrades," cried Squealer almost pleadingly, skipping from side to side and whisking his tail, "surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?"

    Please be prepared to share your thoughts with regard to this quote as a precursor to today's discussion of Animal Farm.
    --Please SEE ME before leaving class today:
    • Ian W.
    S. the C.
    --a note about the blog and Google Classroom
    --Beginning with the end in mind:

    End-of-Unit Assessment Writing Prompt:

    Write a text-based, grammatically sound, tightly-written response of two to three paragraphs.  In your response, respond to the following question so as to reveal a theme statement (central idea) of Animal Farm: What is George Orwell's "thesis" about human nature as revealed in the story he tells?  Then, analyze how Orwell's use of symbolism helps develop his "thesis" about human nature.  Use at least three pieces of strong textual evidence spanning the entire text to support your analysis, and be sure to tie back to your claim often.


    --really beginning with the end in mind!--the Essential "Question" that overarches our course:


    Why do people say what they say, do what they do, etc.?  What are human beings really like?  By nature, are human beings inherently evil or good or...?


    --briefly discuss thoughts stemming from the "Jump Off"
    --agenda/HW

    Discussion Preparation -- Animal Farm--Beginning to End
    --view the following clips, bearing in mind both the claim written on the front board and the quotation shared/briefly discussed to kick off today's class:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpYQfFcPUkM




    --spend 8 minutes finishing preparing for today's discussion geared around the following:
    • supporting/refuting the claim written on the front board (focused mostly here in Block 4 ACE)
      • academic argument vs. typical argument/quarrel
      • taking it to text
        • source awareness/credibility
    • arriving at rough theme statements for Animal Farm
    • human nature
    • the parallels between Animal Farm and the Russian Revolution
    Discussion -- Animal Farm--Beginning to End
    --engage in discussion as per the bulleted list above until about 10 minutes remaining in class

    Transition

    --Please re-column the desks and pick up the following items from the front table:

    • a good-smelling marker or two
    • a sheet of computer paper
    Closure Preparation/Looking Ahead
    --First, take down your poster currently hung on the greenboard.  Then, open up your notebook to a clean sheet of paper.  Date the page (12/7/2017 [ACE] or 12/8/2017 [BDF]) and label this section of your notes "My Current Answer to the Essential 'Question'".  Then, thoughtfully respond to the following questions:

    • What is your current answer to the Essential "Question" that overarches our course?  (Here are the related questions: Why do people say what they say, do what they do, etc.?  What are human beings really like?  By nature, are human beings inherently evil or good or...?)  After some thought--I encourage you to look through any notes you have taken over the course of the past few weeks during our work with Animal Farm--, write your updated claim about human nature in your notebook.  Re-read and revise your claim as necessary; then, write your claim neatly in marker on your sheet of computer paper.  (Please note that if time permits, you will be invited to share your claim with me and the rest of the class! :) ) 

    Closure -- Ball Toss (time permitting)
    • What is your claim?
    • What do you find yourself thinking about, picturing, etc. as your claim continues coming together in your mind?
    • How might you support your claim?
    • What would naysayers say?
    HW (Practice/Take-Home Assessment/Class Preparation)
    --Complete a total of 45 minutes of Membean training as directed before 11:59 PM on Thursday, 12/7.  If you fail to appropriately train between now and the administration of Vocabulary Quiz #4, you will not be permitted to take the quiz until you catch up (see the "Membean Routine" document).
    --Complete another 45 minutes of Membean training as directed before 11:59 PM on Thursday, 12/14.  If you fail to appropriately train between now and the administration of Vocabulary Quiz #4, you will not be permitted to take the quiz until you catch up (see the "Membean Routine" document).
    HW (Class Preparation)
    --You are expected to select your next free reading book by the beginning of NEXT class (Monday, 12/11 [ACE]/Tuesday, 12/12 [BDF]).  Please see me if you would like help and/or a recommendation!  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS!
    --If you have already selected a free reading book, aim to read at least 10 pages between now and next class.  "Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body" (Joseph Addison).

    English 9--12/7/2017 & 12/8/2017

    Jump Off (5-10 mins.)
    --Please place your evidence of having purposefully re-read Stage 4 of "St. Lucy's..." on the floor next to your desk.  Then, take out your free reading book and read for the first few minutes of class so that I can check your work prior to today's discussion activities.
    --Please SEE ME before leaving class today:
    • Jillian G.
    S. the C. (5-8 mins.)
    --a note about the blog and Google Classroom
    --You should leave class today...

    • with a clearer sense of how to read literature purposefully--when annotating, what should I be writing?!
    • much more deeply understanding Stage 4 of "St. Lucy's..." (and, as such, more deeply understanding the entire story)
    • better prepared to craft a ready-to-support meaningful and complex theme statement for the short story.
    --beginning with the end in mind--our ultimate purpose for re-reading the short story:

    End-of-Mini-Unit Assessment Writing Prompt:
    Write a well-developed paragraph in which you support a meaningful and complex theme statement for Karen Russell's "St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves."  Use at least three pieces of strong textual evidence spanning the entire text, and be sure to tie back to your theme statement often.


    --agenda/HW

    Small-Group Discussion #1 -- Stage 4 of "St. Lucy's..." (30-40 mins.)
    --directions MODELED with "THEME DEVELOPMENT" group
    --Transition
    • get back into initial groups assigned at the end of last class block (same purposeful re-reading task)
    THEME DEVELOPMENT

    • Bean
    • Mahnke
    • Romanowski
    • Rowe
    • Allison
    • Krebbeks
    • LaRue
    • Minnehan, S.
    • Bloser
    • Cavallaro
    • Cicero
    • Duris
    • Kretchmer
    • Shaver
    • Stahl
    CHARACTER MOTIVE, COMPLEXITY, AND DEVELOPMENT

    • Countryman
    • Genthner
    • Kearney
    • Marsh
    • Barnard
    • Castrovinci
    • Neyhart
    • Bogue
    • Field
    • Litteer
    • Neckers
    • Sexton
    • Yamin
    PURPOSEFUL DICTION
    • Maxwell
    • Miller, A.
    • Stewart
    • Bernard
    • Forbes
    • Wagner
    • Fitzgerald
    • French
    • Hensler
    • Lane
    • Minnehan, A.
    STRUCTURE IMPACTING MEANING
      • Abrey
      • Donnelly
      • Marshall
      • Henderson-Schultz
      • Parker
      • Williamson
      • Gunn
      • Hoffere
      • Leverson
      • Miller, M.
      • VanZandt

      --engage in discussion/note-taking/purposeful re-reading as directed
      • share purposeful re-reading notes already completed with each other (10 mins.)
      • finish purposeful re-reading task together (5-10 mins.)
      • Transition (1-2 mins.)
        • Pick up a copy of the "Stage 4 Discussion Highlights" halfsheet from the front table.
      • Closure (5-10 mins.)
        • complete halfsheet task as directed
      Transition (1-2 mins.)
      --next groups assigned (different purposeful re-reading tasks--SEE INDEX CARD)

      Small-Group Discussion #2 -- Stage 4 of "St. Lucy's..." (until 30-ish mins. remaining [5-ish to 10-ish mins. total])

      --engage in discussion and note-taking as directed:
      • task-by-task, quickly share first highlight with each other--continue in this manner until as many highlights as possible are shared or time runs out
        • You are encouraged to challenge ideas and conclusions shared, especially in instances where dissent occurs.
      Transition (1-2 mins.)
      --Send a group spokesperson up to the front of the classroom to pick up index cards for today's comprehension check.

      Comprehension Check/Whole-Class Discussion -- "Stage 4 Comprehension and Purposeful Reading Quiz" (remainder of class)

      --directions given:
      • quietly come to consensus for each multiple choice question--reveal response upon hearing the word "reveal"
      • following each question, we will discuss correct/incorrect responses and continue marking up the text (PICK BACK UP HERE IN BLOCK 2 ACE WITH #10)
      HW (Class Preparation)
      --You are expected to select your next free reading book by the beginning of NEXT class (Monday, 12/11 [ACE]/Tuesday, 12/12 [BDF]).  Please see me if you would like help and/or a recommendation!  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS!
      --If you have already selected a free reading book, aim to read at least 10 pages between now and next class.  "Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body" (Joseph Addison).

      Friday, December 1, 2017

      English 10 Honors--12/5/2017 & 12/6/2017

      Jump Off (1 min.)

      --Pick up a copy of the "Membean Routine" sheet from the front table.  I want you to have another copy of this sheet so that I can rest assured the expectations are entirely clear.
      --If you have already fulfilled the Free Reading Course Component for Marking Period 1 and Marking Period 2 (e.g., turned in a one-pager or given a "book talk"), take out your current free reading book, settle in, and enjoy the forthcoming reading block!
      --If you have not yet fulfilled this requirement, wait quietly for further directions.


      Transition (5-8 mins.)

      --sample completed one-pagers shared--which is stronger and why?
      --quick overview of the one-pager options
      --pick up a one-pager from the front of the classroom if you have yet to complete one

      "Assessment"/DEAR -- Free Reading Books (30-40 mins.)

      --complete one-pagers
      --When you finish and turn in your one-pager, select one of the following:
      • Quietly look for a new novel-length work in our classroom library
        • Engage in free reading of a novel-length work
          • Engage in free reading of Upfront newsmagazine  
            Transition (2-3 mins.)
            --Pick up a copy of each of the following documents from the front table:
            • "Orwell's Allegory and the United States of America--Supporting an Argument"
            • "Orwell's Allegory and the United States of America--Writing a Counterargument (Method #1)"
            Discussion/Discussion Preparation -- Animal Farm--Beginning to End (flex time)
            --Has anyone noticed the claim written up on the front board?  Your thoughts?
            --oral reading of each of the two documents picked up during the "Transition"
            --Q & A

            HW Time (time permitting)
            --work quietly and independently first
            • Take out any materials that you think will aid you (e.g., your "Orwell's Allegory and the Russian Revolution" chart, your Post-it-ed copy of Animal Farm, your phone, etc.)
            --time permitting, continue working after finding a partner or two

            HW (Practice/Take-Home Assessment/Class Preparation)
            --Complete a total of 45 minutes of Membean training as directed before 11:59 PM on Thursday, 12/7.  If you fail to appropriately train between now and the administration of Vocabulary Quiz #4, you will not be permitted to take the quiz until you catch up (see the “Membean Routine” document).
            HW (Class Preparation)
            --You are expected to select your next free reading book by the beginning of class on Monday, 12/11 [ACE]/Tuesday, 12/12 [BDF]).  Please see me if you would like help and/or a recommendation!  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS!  Reminder: Wednesday, 12/6 is the magic day for taking care of free reading business for the last two marking periods if you have not already done so!
            HW (Class Preparation/Take-Home Assessment)
            --After making your selection, complete either the "Orwell's Allegory and the United States of America--Supporting an Argument" or the "Orwell's Allegory and the United States of America--Writing a Counterargument (Method #1)" as directed.  Your best work is due at the beginning of NEXT class (Thursday, 12/7 [ACE]/Friday, 12/8 [BDF]) during which time I will check for completion.  Please be aware of our homework policy with the awareness that I will absolutely follow it to a T.