Monday, November 20, 2017

English 10 Honors--11/27/2017 & 11/28/2017 DRAFT

MEMBEAN ASSESSMENT AFTER BREAK

The following passage exists in Chapter 3 of George Orwell's Animal Farm after the animals realize that the pigs have been taking the milk for themselves and also taking all of the extra apples:

"Squealer was sent to make the necessary explanations to the others.
     'Comrades!' he cried.  'You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in a spirit of selfishness and privilege?  Many of us actually dislike milk and apples.  I dislike them myself.  Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health.  Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain substances absolutely  necessary to the well-being of a pig.  We pigs are brainworkers.  The whole management and organization of this farm depend on us.  Day and night we are watching over your welfare.  It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples.  Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty?  Jones would come back!  Surely, comrades," cried Squealer almost pleadingly, skipping from side to side and whisking his tail, "surely there is no one among you who wants to see Jones come back?"



--continue previous discussion
--AoW back
--Squealer analysis (end of Ch. 3)
  • methods of manipulation
  • present in current politics?
Transition--Pick up one of each of the following documents from the front table:
  • "Propaganda/Some Types of Propaganda"
  • "Defining Propaganda II"

After reading the first set of directions on the "Propaganda/Some Types of Propaganda" sheet, engage in purposeful reading until I ask you to stop.

Instructional Activity -- Animal Farm Unit--Propaganda/Some Types of Propaganda
--Following this activity, you should be able to...
  • roughly define the term propaganda
  • define, provide examples of, and begin to recognize each of the provided types of propaganda
--either independently or in pairs, finish reading "Defining Propaganda II" and craft a definition of propaganda
--whole-class share-out
--oral reading of the second set of directions/Q & A
--continue working independently or in pairs in order to fill in the blanks under each provided type of propaganda
--whole-class share-out

Application Activity -- Recognizing Propaganda in Current Affairs/Political Commentary Shows

--view the first five minutes of the opening monologue of the following clip in order to answer these questions: 

  • What types of propaganda are being used?  How so?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cqhWyUOMdo

--pair/share

--repeat this process for the first five minutes of the following clip:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gzFyHesYsN4
Transition
--Pick up an index card from the front table.  Write your name at the top of the lined side of the card.  Then, respond to the key question driving the preceding activities:

  • How might recognizing and understanding different types of propaganda impact important decisions that you make in the future?

--When you finish, leave your index card on your desk.

Friday, November 17, 2017

English 9--11/27/2017 & 11/28/2017 DRAFT

"As the literary theorist Robert Scholes puts it, reading, conceived "as a submission to the intentions of another[,] is the first step" to understanding what a literary work is saying.  For "if we do not postulate the existence of [an author] behind the verbal text," we will "simply project our own subjective modes of thought and desire upon the text."  In other words, unless we do the best we can to get at what the author is saying, we will never truly recognize his or her ideas except as some version of our own.  Scholes acknowledges that good reading often involves going beyond the author's intention, pointing out contradictions and ideological blind spots, but he argues that we must recognize the author's intention before we can try to see beyond it in these ways" (Graff and Birkenstein, They Say/I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing, 199).

--one detail per theme word--write on a Post-it--stick on board under appropriate theme word
--assign groups per theme w0rd--agree or disagree--to what extent--why

  • do one together first as a model
--closure--theme statement (life philosophy!)--pick a word
--begin Stage 4


S. the C.
--You should leave class today with...

  • a deeper understanding of theme in literature, as evidenced by your ability to respond to the four focus questions/prompts below:
    • What is a theme statement?
    • How does a mere theme differ from a theme statement?
    • How can a reader turn a theme into a theme statement?
    • Write a meaningful and complex theme statement for P.D. Eastman's "The Best Nest".
  • a deeper understanding of what makes a theme statement meaningful and complex
  • the ability to check the meaning and complexity of a theme statement and access to a resource to do so
  • a clearer idea of how "St. Lucy's..." connects to real life, which might help you "zero in" on a meaningful and complex theme statement as we wrap up the story
    --You might leave class today with...
    • a refreshed outlook on your own life
    • more pieces of specific textual evidence related to theme words for "St. Lucy's..."
    • details you end up eventually using in your End-of-Mini-Unit Assessment Writing Piece.
    • a rough sense of what Karen Russell is suggesting about one (or several?!) of the emergent themes of the story.
      • In other words, you might leave class today with a rough theme statement for "St. Lucy's..."!

    --beginning with the end in mind--our ultimate purpose for re-reading the short story:


    End-of-Mini-Unit Assessment Writing Prompt:
    Write a well-developed paragraph in which you support a meaningful and complex theme statement for Karen Russell's "St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves."  Use at least three pieces of strong textual evidence spanning the entire text, and be sure to tie back to your theme statement often.






    Transition
    --Please take out your copies of the theme tracking documents for both Stage 2 and Stage 3 as well as your copy of "St. Lucy's...".

    HW (Class Preparation)
    --If you did not do your best work actively/purposefully reading Stage 3 of "St. Lucy's..." via the "Theme Tracking Document--Stage 3" sheet, improve your notes between now and next class.  Please bear in mind that ultimately, you are working toward writing a "bang-up" End-of-Mini-Unit Assessment Writing Piece!
    Miscellaneous
    --Read your free reading book for at least 15 minutes between now and next class.  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS.  You have up until early-December to finish your book.

    Detail dump by theme and stage
    • engage in synthesis/inquiry (traveling the path to theme statements!)
    Stage 4
    • small groups--complete reading tasks bearing in mind forthcoming assessment
    Application Activity -- Theme Clips
    --rationale/directions
    • Today's clips relate most closely to the following themes:
      • civilization/lack of civilization
      • loss of identity
      • fitting in
      • family
      • fear
      • compassion/care
    --view first clip
    • The Role of Missionaries in the Colonization of Africa (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=701ev5HywZ4)
    --view second clip
    • Shooting Hoops with Twenty One Pilots (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H3N9IBrC480)
    --view third clip
    • Wonder Movie Trailer (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngiK1gQKgK8)
    --view final clip
    • Ellen Surprises Inspiring Baltimore Teacher Mr. O.
    --Transition
    • Please pick up an index card from the front shelf and write your name at the top of the lined side.
    --Activity Closure
    • Pick one of the starred themes from the list on the front board.  Then, based on your life experiences and any thoughts that crept into your mind while viewing today's clips (and maybe even your current understanding of "St. Lucy's..."!), in the form of a few sentences, write your current philosophy regarding the theme you have selected.  I HAVE WRITTEN AN EXAMPLE ON THE FRONT BOARD FOR THE THEME OF "REBELLION".
    Lesson Closure -- Shuffle-Share
    • draw index cards and discuss life philosophies (theme statements, really! ;) )

    Thursday, November 16, 2017

    English 10 Honors--11/20/2017 & 11/21/2017

    Jump Off
    --Please pick up the following from the front table:
    • a copy of the "Free Reading--Course Component Fulfillment Options for Marking Periods 1 and 2" sheet
    • an "Orwell's Allegory and the Russian Revolution" chart
    • the "Revolution in Russia: Causes and Impacts" reading
    After an oral reading and Q and A about each of these documents, we will take a vote about how to proceed for the remainder of our time together today.

    Flex Time

    HW (Class Preparation/Take-Home Assessment)
    --A Membean assessment will occur upon our return from break.  Are you entirely current with your training?
    --Complete your "Orwell's Allegory and the Russian Revolution" chart prior to NEXT class.  Expect me to collect your work and/or a discussion geared in part around your work.
    --Go back through Chapter 7 and Chapter 8 of Animal Farm (up to the end of page 75).  Did you demonstrate your best skill level in reading actively/purposefully via the Post-it Note strategy?  Expect any or all of the following to occur in the future: 
    • collection of your Post-its for assessment purposes
    • a "60/40" reading assessment
    • further discussion geared around your Post-its 
    Miscellaneous
    --Aim to read at least 10 pages of your free reading book each day over break.  If you achieve this goal, you will have read 60-70 pages!  (I know that I, personally, am quite looking forward to reading John Green's new book, Turtles All the Way Down!)  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS.  You have up until early-December to finish your book (see the "Free Reading--Course Component Fulfillment Options for Marking Periods 1 and 2" sheet).
    --Enjoy the break!  May the effects of tryptophan spare you from having to hear conversations about the effects of tryptophan.

    English 9--11/20/2017 & 11/21/2017

    FYI: Due in part to several absences across my class blocks, we are not moving forward with our work with "St. Lucy's..." until we return from break!

    BLOCK 2 ACE/BLOCK 2 BDF

    Jump Off
    --Please pick up a copy of the "Free Reading--Course Component Fulfillment Options for Marking Periods 1 and 2" sheet from the front table.  After an oral reading and Q and A about this document, you will have the rest of today's abbreviated class block to engage in free reading.  Enjoy! :)


    Free Reading
    --engage in free reading of either your free reading book or Upfront newsmagazine

    HW (Class Preparation)

    --If you still have not done your best work actively/purposefully reading Stage 3 of "St. Lucy's..." via the "Theme Tracking Document--Stage 3" sheet, improve your notes prior to returning from break.  Definitely be prepared to share your work NEXT class (Monday, 11/27 [ACE] or Tuesday, 11/28 [BDF])Please bear in mind that ultimately, you are working toward writing a "bang-up" End-of-Mini-Unit Assessment Writing Piece!
    Miscellaneous
    --Aim to read at least 10 pages of your free reading book each day over break.  If you achieve this goal, you will have read 60-70 pages!  (I know that I, personally, am quite looking forward to reading John Green's new book, Turtles All the Way Down!)  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS.  You have up until early-December to finish your book (see the "Free Reading--Course Component Fulfillment Options for Marking Periods 1 and 2" sheet).
    --For what are turkeys thankful?......
















    ......Vegetarians.
    Enjoy the break!


    BLOCK 3 BDF

    Jump Off
    --Please pick up your index card from last class from me at the front table.
    --Please SEE ME before leaving class today:
    • Abigail C.
    • Losha C.
    S. the C.
    --You should leave class today with...

    • a clearer idea of how "St. Lucy's..." connects to real life, which might help you "zero in" on a meaningful and complex theme statement as we wrap up the story.
      --You might leave class today with...
      • a refreshed outlook on your own life.

      --beginning with the end in mind--our ultimate purpose for re-reading the short story:


      End-of-Mini-Unit Assessment Writing Prompt:
      Write a well-developed paragraph in which you support a meaningful and complex theme statement for Karen Russell's "St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves."  Use at least three pieces of strong textual evidence spanning the entire text, and be sure to tie back to your theme statement often.

      --agenda/HW

      Application Activity (cont.) -- Theme Clips/Life Philosophies
      --view final clip
      • Ellen Surprises Inspiring Baltimore Teacher Mr. O. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiGjxl3XKJQ)
      --Activity Closure
      • Based on your life experiences and any thoughts that crept into your mind while viewing the clips last class and today (and maybe even your current understanding of "St. Lucy's..."!), in the form of a few sentences, write your current life philosophy regarding the theme you wrote down on your index card.  REMINDER: MY EXAMPLE FOR THE THEME OF "REBELLION" IS STILL WRITTEN ON THE FRONT BOARD.
      Lesson Closure -- Shuffle-Share (time permitting)
      • draw index cards and discuss life philosophies (theme statements, really! ;) )
      Transition
      --Please pick up a copy of the "Free Reading--Course Component Fulfillment Options for Marking Periods 1 and 2" sheet from the front table.  After an oral reading and Q and A about this document, you will have the rest of today's abbreviated class block to engage in free reading.  Enjoy! :)

      Free Reading
      --engage in free reading of either your free reading book or Upfront newsmagazine


      HW (Class Preparation)
      --If you still have not done your best work actively/purposefully reading Stage 3 of "St. Lucy's..." via the "Theme Tracking Document--Stage 3" sheet, improve your notes prior to returning from break.  Definitely be prepared to share your work NEXT class (Monday, 11/27 [ACE] or Tuesday, 11/28 [BDF])Please bear in mind that ultimately, you are working toward writing a "bang-up" End-of-Mini-Unit Assessment Writing Piece!
      Miscellaneous
      --Aim to read at least 10 pages of your free reading book each day over break.  If you achieve this goal, you will have read 60-70 pages!  (I know that I, personally, am quite looking forward to reading John Green's new book, Turtles All the Way Down!)  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS.  You have up until early-December to finish your book ("Free Reading--Course Component Fulfillment Options for Marking Periods 1 and 2" sheet).
      --For what are turkeys thankful?......




















      ......Vegetarians.
      Enjoy the break!

      Thursday, November 9, 2017

      English 10 Honors--11/16/2017 & 11/17/2017

      Jump Off
      --Please pick up approximately 8-10 Post-its from the front shelf.
      --The following students have been referred as per policy due to not handing in assignments on time:

      • Wubazz
      • Papa Smurf
      S. the C.
      --Beginning with the end in mind:


      End-of-Unit Assessment Writing Prompt:
      Write a text-based, grammatically sound, tightly-written response of two to three paragraphs.  In your response, respond to the following question so as to reveal a theme statement (central idea) of Animal Farm: What is George Orwell's "thesis" about human nature as revealed in the story he tells?  Then, analyze how Orwell's use of symbolism helps develop his "thesis" about human nature.  Use at least three pieces of strong textual evidence spanning the entire text to support your analysis, and be sure to tie back to your claim often.

      --Really beginning with the end in mind!--the Essential Question that overarches our course:


      Why do people say what they say, do what they do, etc.?  What are human beings really like?  By nature, are human beings inherently evil or good or...?


      --agenda/HW

      Discussion #1 Preparation -- Chapter 1 Post-it Pick-and-Stick
      --Pick-and-stick three Post-its to the back wall for Chapter 1, considering the following questions:
      • What did you write on each Post-it?
      • Why did you write what you did?
        • I WILL MODEL FIRST WITH MY POST-IT FROM PAGE 4 OF THE TEXT.
      Transition
      --Form horseshoes (hey-yo! :) ) in the southeast corner of the classroom for our Chapter 1 discussion.

      Discussion #1 -- Chapter 1--Post-it Processing
      --look at Post-its page-by-page so as to...
      • better understand what Orwell's text invites us to think is important, pay attention to, etc.
      • more deeply understand Orwell's novella (its purpose, its devices, etc.)
        • begin preparing for writing the End-of-Unit Assessment Writing Piece
      • better execute the Post-it strategy moving forward
      Discussion #2 Preparation -- Active/Purposeful Reading/Symbol Tracking--Chapters 1-6
      --quietly and independently, ... 
      • review your symbol tracking work from two classes ago
      • continue looking through your Post-its
      Transition
      --Form an alphabetical-by-favorite-animal circle out of the desks.

      Discussion #2 -- Active/Purposeful Reading/Symbol Tracking--Chapters 1-6
      --whole-class share-out/discussion ultimately intended to help you write the End-of-Unit Assessment Writing Piece

      Transition
      --re-column the desks

      Closure -- The Final Countdown

      HW (Practice/Take-Home Assessment)
      --Complete a total of 45 minutes of Membean training as directed before 11:59 PM TONIGHT.  If you fail to appropriately train between now and the administration of Vocabulary Quiz #3, you will not be permitted to take the quiz (see the "Membean Routine" document).
      Writing
      --The due date for submitting a revised Thematic Writing Assignment--Partner Interviews essay for the Cumulative Writing Portfolio is TODAY!--YOU MUST schedule a meeting with me to go over your revisions; simply handing in the revisions is unacceptable as per the protocol (unless, of course, we have already met).
      HW (Class Preparation/Take-Home Assessment)
      --Read Chapter 7 and Chapter 8 of Animal Farm (up to the end of page 75).  Demonstrate your best skill level in reading actively/purposefully via the Post-it Note strategy, and expect any or all of the following to occur next time that we meet: 

      • collection of your Post-its for assessment purposes
      • a "60/40" reading assessment
      • a discussion geared around your Post-its
      Miscellaneous
      --Read your free reading book for at least 15 minutes between now and next class. ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS.  You have up until early-December to finish your book.

      English 9--11/16/2017 & 11/17/2017

      Jump Off
      --Pick up a copy of the halfsheet titled "Theme Statement Comprehension Check" from the front shelf.  Based on your knowledge and understanding from last class, respond to the questions/prompts to the best of your ability.  IF POSSIBLE, DO NOT USE YOUR NOTES.  Good luck!
      --Please SEE ME before leaving class today:
      • Brandon B.
      • Lana B.
      • Abigail C.
      • Losha C.
      • Abigail F.
      • Rebecca L.
      • Matthew S.
      • Clayton V.
      S. the C.
      --You should leave class today with...

      • a deeper understanding of theme in literature, as evidenced by your ability to respond to the four focus questions/prompts below:
        • What is a theme statement?
        • How does a mere theme differ from a theme statement?
        • How can a reader turn a theme into a theme statement?
        • Write a meaningful and complex theme statement for P.D. Eastman's "The Best Nest".
      • a deeper understanding of what makes a theme statement meaningful and complex
      • the ability to check the meaning and complexity of a theme statement and access to a resource to do so
      • a clearer idea of how "St. Lucy's..." connects to real life, which might help you "zero in" on a meaningful and complex theme statement as we wrap up the story
        --You might leave class today with...
        • a refreshed outlook on your own life

        --beginning with the end in mind--our ultimate purpose for re-reading the short story:


        End-of-Mini-Unit Assessment Writing Prompt:
        Write a well-developed paragraph in which you support a meaningful and complex theme statement for Karen Russell's "St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves."  Use at least three pieces of strong textual evidence spanning the entire text, and be sure to tie back to your theme statement often.

        --agenda/HW
        --pair share

        Notetaking/Application Activity -- P.D. Eastman's "The Best Nest": Theme Statements/Theme Statement Analysis
        --whole-class share-out via a drawing of cards in order to answer the three focus questions
        --theme statement shared out via brave volunteer (fourth focus prompt)--you are strongly advised to copy the theme statement shared on the front board into your notebook or on your notes page (if you have room) and continue revising, adding to, etc. the theme statement!
        --Transition
        • Please pick up a copy of the "Theme Statements--The Do Nots/The Dos" sheet from the front shelf.
        --take a look at the "Theme Statements--The Do Nots/The Dos" PowerPoint:

        • The Do Nots
          • share a row and "The Best Nest" example from whiteboard--check peer's theme statement
          • repeat process for remaining rows/examples
        • The Dos
          • share a row and work together to improve "The Best Nest" example (if necessary/possible)
          • repeat process for remaining rows/examples
        Application Activity -- Theme Clips/Life Philosophies
        --rationale/directions
        • Today's clips relate most closely to the following themes:
          • civilization/lack of civilization
          • loss of identity
          • fitting in
          • family
          • fear
          • compassion/care
        --Do any of these themes require defining before we begin?!
        --view first clip
        • The Role of Missionaries in the Colonization of Africa (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=701ev5HywZ4)
        --view second clip
        • Shooting Hoops with Twenty One Pilots (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H3N9IBrC480)
        --view third clip
        • Wonder Movie Trailer (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngiK1gQKgK8)
        --view final clip
        • Ellen Surprises Inspiring Baltimore Teacher Mr. O. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiGjxl3XKJQ)
        --Transition
        • Please pick up an index card from the front shelf and write your name at the top of the lined side.
        --Activity Closure
        • Pick one of the starred themes from the list on the front board.  Then, based on your life experiences and any thoughts that crept into your mind while viewing today's clips (and maybe even your current understanding of "St. Lucy's..."!), in the form of a few sentences, write your current life philosophy regarding the theme you have selected.  I HAVE WRITTEN AN EXAMPLE ON THE FRONT BOARD FOR THE THEME OF "REBELLION".
        Lesson Closure -- Shuffle-Share
        • draw index cards and discuss life philosophies (theme statements, really! ;) )
        HW (Class Preparation)
        --If you did not do your best work actively/purposefully reading Stage 3 of "St. Lucy's..." via the "Theme Tracking Document--Stage 3" sheet, improve your notes over the course of the next few days.  Be prepared to share your work NEXT class (Monday, 11/20 [ACE] or Tuesday, 11/21 [BDF])Please bear in mind that ultimately, you are working toward writing a "bang-up" End-of-Mini-Unit Assessment Writing Piece!
        Miscellaneous
        --Read your free reading book for at least 15 minutes between now and next class.  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS.  You have up until early-December to finish your book.