Tuesday, March 21, 2017

English 10 Honors--3/24/2017 DRAFT

RETURN LOTF IF YOU HAVE YET TO DO SO
MEMBEAN QUIZ
WRITING PIECES RETURNED--REREAD (IT'S BEEN A WHILE!)

  • WHICH ONE WOULD YOU LIKE TO REVISE AND SUBMIT TO BOCES?
    • MY ASTERISK = MY PREFERENCE (BUT YOU CAN CERTAINLY DISREGARD ME!!!)
    • FEEL FREE TO ASK FOR ADVICE FROM PEERS!
  • DUE DATE/DIRECTIONS FOR SUBMISSIONS OF REVISIONS
(WILL DO "MADNESS" UPON SUBMISSION OF REVISIONS)

THE ALCHEMIST--LET'S GET IT STARTED!



English 9--3/22/2017 & 3/23/2017

Jump Off

--Please do the following in the first 5-ish minutes of class: 
  • take out your copy of the “Drama Terms Notes/Poetry Terms Notes” document from last class
  • take out or pick up from the black basket on the front table your poster from last class
  • finish making your poster in the time permitted
  • engage in free reading if you are already finished or when you finish
--The following students need to SEE ME after class today in order to discuss an INCOMPLETE recorded for Marking Period 4.  If you fail to see me, I will have to refer you to the main office for central detention so that we can "take care of business" after school:
  • Grace B.
  • Lilly D.
  • Trevor F.
  • Austin H.
  • Hunter L.
  • Jasmine M.
  • Donovan M.
S. the C.
--Reminder: Beginning with the end in mind--our ultimate purpose when closely re-reading sections of The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet:

ROUGH End-of-Unit Assessment Writing Prompt:
Write a multi-paragraph essay in which you argue the extent to which both Romeo and Juliet are fatally impulsive by analyzing their responses to similar circumstances.  Then, answer the "so what" question: Why did Shakespeare develop his two main characters in this manner?

--agenda/HW

Activity (cont.) -- Drama Terms Notes/Poetry Terms Notes Posters
--Reminder:  The directions given for the activity read as follows: 
  • Use resources (smartphones, computer, literature books, dictionaries, etc.) in order to determine what is needed to fill in the blank(s) for your term
  • Paraphrase the definition of your term
  • Create a visually appealing poster for your term to share with the rest of the class, including
    • the term prominently displayed
    • the paraphrased definition of your term
    • an example of your term “in action”
    • corresponding visual
  • Prepare a brief presentation to share with the rest of the class in which you...
    • share your term and paraphrased definition
    • make sure that your classmates are able to fill in the blanks on their notes page for your term
    • share your example and visual in order to clarify the meaning of your term
    • are prepared to respond to any questions from your classmates regarding your term.
Mini-Presentations/Notetaking -- Drama Terms Notes/Poetry Terms Notes
--When preparing/practicing your mini-presentation, keep this information about content and these seven public speaking tips in mind:
Content
    • Your presentation must include all four of the items included in the bulleted list above, but you should not just read from your notes page and your poster!
    Delivery (Public Speaking Tips)
    • Pause/smile in front and gain the attention of your audience before speaking.
    • Speak loudly enough to be heard by all.
    • Speak at an appropriate speed (NOT TOO FAST).
    • Speak with enthusiasm.
    • Make clear attempts at eye contact to ALL parts of the classroom.
    • Limit vocal fillers ("umm", "ahh", long silences, etc.)--NO MORE THAN 3-5 PER MINUTE.
    • Limit distracting body movements (podium tapping, hair smoothing, etc.). 
    --mini-presentations practiced in pairs
    --mini-presentations delivered/notetaking

    Transition
    --Pick up a copy of the Act II Reading Guide from the front table and engage in a "materials assessment" together.  What are we "looking for" while viewing Act II?

    Film/First-Draft "Reading" -- Act II of Franco Zeffirelli's Romeo and Juliet
    --purposefully view the film until a few minutes remaining in class--gather information for discussion/assessment preparation by jotting down notes and responding to reading guide prompts/questions

    Closure -- Ball Toss
    --Tell us something that you now know/understand that you did not know/understand/understand fully before class today.

    Miscellaneous
    --You can expect to finish viewing and/or discussing Act II in class next time!
    --Aim to read at least 5-10 pages of your free reading book between now and next class (especially since no reading for The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet is being assigned!).  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FINAL FREE READING BOOK OF THE SCHOOL YEAR TO CLASS!

    Monday, March 20, 2017

    English 10 Honors--3/22/2017 DRAFT

    Jump Off
    --Take out a few clean sheets of lined paper.  Write your name at the top of each page.

    S. the C.
    --agenda/HW
    --numbers drawn

    Transition
    --Pick up the sheets for today's assessment ("Lord of the Flies--Novel Assessment 2017").

    Assessment -- Lord of the Flies
    --Carefully read the directions and complete the exam.  Good luck!

    *AS YOU WORK ON THE ASSESSMENT, I WILL COME AROUND AND RETURN YOUR "'MIDTERM' EXAMINATION" SO THAT YOU CAN ENGAGE IN REFLECTION.  I WILL BE RE-COLLECTING THE EXAMS BEFORE YOU LEAVE CLASS TODAY.*

    • What questions do you have about your performance?
    • What suggestions do you have for our group moving forward between now and the June Regents?  (Where are we?  Where do we need to end up??

    --When you finish with today's assessment, ... 
    • reflect/finish reflecting upon your performance on the "'Midterm' Examination"
    • engage in free reading
    Reflection/Free Reading

    HW (Class Preparation)
    --Vocabulary Quiz #5 will take place on Friday, 3/24.  If you have not trained the total number of minutes assigned since Vocabulary Quiz #4, please catch up between now and Friday.  Otherwise, you will not be permitted to take the quiz (see the “Membean Routine” document).
    --Aim to read at least 5-10 pages of your free reading book between now and next class (especially since we are not currently reading a novel together!).  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS!
    --Continue thinking about (and, quite frankly, consider beginning working on) the End-of-Course Assignment--you do not want to wait too long to get started on this!



    Sunday, March 19, 2017

    English 9--3/20/2017 & 3/21/2017

    Jump Off
    --If I have yet to receive a one-pager from you (or received a "voicemail" or engaged in a "book talk"), please place your one-pager in the black basket on the front table.
    --Take out your completed copy of the "Purposeful Re-reading--Act I, scene iii, lines 64-100" document that was assigned as class preparation for today.  Scan back through your responses/annotations in preparation for a brief share-out/discussion.  I am going to draw cards; I have not been fully satisfied with participation lately--I need to hear more voices!
    --The following students need to SEE ME ASAP in order to discuss an INCOMPLETE recorded for Marking Period 4:
    • Grace B.
    • Lilly D.
    • James F.
    • Austin H.
    • Jasmine M.
    • Donovan M.
    • Ollie O.
    • Bryanna R.
    • Storme S.

    --FYI: After 3 PM today, I am taking all unscored mini-tests that I have and scoring them (finished or otherwise!).

    S. the C.
    --Reminder: Beginning with the end in mind--our ultimate purpose when closely re-reading sections of The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet:

    ROUGH End-of-Unit Assessment Writing Prompt:
    Write a multi-paragraph essay in which you argue the extent to which both Romeo and Juliet are fatally impulsive by analyzing their responses to similar circumstances.  Then, answer the "so what" question: Why did Shakespeare develop his two main characters in this manner?

    --agenda/HW

    Share-Out/Discussion -- Act I, scene iii, lines 64-100 of The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet
    --as you and your peers share and I mark up the text on the SMART Board, do the same on your personal copy (cards drawn)

    Transition
    --Pick up a copy of the “Drama Terms Notes/Poetry Terms Notes” document from the front table.  Give it quick scan before directing your attention to the front of the classroom.

    Activity -- Drama Terms Notes/Poetry Terms Notes Posters
    --directions given:
    • Use resources (smartphones, computer, literature books, dictionaries, etc.) in order to determine what is needed to fill in the blank(s) for your term
    • Paraphrase the definition of your term
    • Create a visually appealing poster for your term to share with the rest of the class, including
      • the term prominently displayed
      • the paraphrased definition of your term
      • an example of your term “in action”
      • corresponding visual
    • Prepare a brief presentation to share with the rest of the class in which you...
      • share your term and paraphrased definition
      • make sure that your classmates are able to fill in the blanks on their notes page for your term
      • share your example and visual in order to clarify the meaning of your term
      • are prepared to respond to any questions from your classmates regarding your term.
    WILL SHARE AN EXEMPLAR FOR THE TERM “METAPHOR”
    • Terms assigned/materials gathered
    • Quiet and independent work time
    Mini-Presentations/Notetaking -- Drama Terms Notes/Poetry Terms Notes
    --When preparing/practicing your mini-presentation, keep this information about content and these seven public speaking tips in mind:
    Content
      • Your presentation must include all four of the items included in the bulleted list above, but you should not just read from your notes page and your poster!
      Delivery (Public Speaking Tips)
      • Pause/smile in front and gain the attention of your audience before speaking.
      • Speak loudly enough to be heard by all.
      • Speak at an appropriate speed (NOT TOO FAST).
      • Speak with enthusiasm.
      • Make clear attempts at eye contact to ALL parts of the classroom.
      • Limit vocal fillers ("umm", "ahh", long silences, etc.)--NO MORE THAN 3-5 PER MINUTE.
      • Limit distracting body movements (podium tapping, hair smoothing, etc.). 
      --mini-presentations practiced in pairs
      --mini-presentations delivered/notetaking

      Closure -- Ball Toss
      --Tell us something that you now know/understand that you did not know/understand/understand fully before class today.

      HW (Class Preparation)
      --Consider the following question: In addition to sections analyzed together over the course of the past few classes, what other section or sections of the play could you consider for use within your end-of-unit essay?
      Miscellaneous
      --You can expect to finish the mini-presentation/notetaking activity next class.
      --Aim to read at least 5-10 pages of your free reading book between now and next class (especially since no reading for The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet is being assigned!).  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FINAL FREE READING BOOK OF THE SCHOOL YEAR TO CLASS!

      Thursday, March 16, 2017

      English 10 Honors--3/20/2017

      Jump Off
      --Consider each of the following questions:
      • What is literary criticism?
      • What is a parody?
      Can you provide an answer to one or both of these questions?  Today, we will explore both a piece of literary criticism and a parody of LotF as we wrap up our work with Golding's novel.
      --The following students need to SEE ME ASAP in order to discuss Membean and/or an INCOMPLETE recorded for Marking Period 4:
      • Jackson B.
      • Nate C.
      • Abi D.
      • Jason D.
      • Zena W.
      S. the C.
      --FYI: Your "Midterm" exams mirroring the NYS ELA (Common Core) Regents have been scored and inputted into SchoolTool.  I plan on returning the exams next class so that you can see how you did, look through my feedback, and talk about moving forward between now and the administration of the actual Regents in June.  Overall, I thought we did quite well as a group!
      --agenda/HW
      • exemplary passage identification response shared
      Transition
      --Pick up a copy of the piece of literary criticism titled "Lord of the Flies: Beezlebub Revisited" from the front table.  Briefly survey the piece, taking note of the title, author, source, and date of publication.

      Discussion Preparation -- Oldsey and Weintraub's "Lord of the Flies: Beezlebub Revisited"
      --What is literary criticism?
      --independent gist reading/somewhat purposeful reading (divide and conquer!) as preparation for today's discussion (close reading will occur independently in the future by any students thinking about using this piece within the End-of-Course Assignment)--in the margins next to each paragraph that you read, ...
      • jot down the gist/write a brief summary
      • underline anything that either confirms or deepens your understanding of William Golding's "thesis" about human nature
      • underline anything interesting that makes you think "oooooo!" or "ah ha!" (or whatever!)
      *I'LL MODEL FIRST!*

      Transition -- form a circle

      Discussion -- LotF Chs. 1-12--So What?!
      --What would you like to discuss (e.g., confirmation of your understanding gleaned from reading literary criticism)?  What questions do you have (e.g., about the list of terms shared last class)?  What should we make sure to address during today's discussion, bearing in mind both the final novel assessment and the End-of-Course Assignment? 
      --engage in discussion (you know the drill!)--taking notes is strongly encouraged!

      Brain Break -- Lord of the Flies: A Facebook Spoof (from Sarah Schmelling's Ophelia Joined the Group Maidens Who Don't Float)
      --What is a parody?
      --oral reading for LOLZ (maybe?)

      Transition -- re-column the desks and pick up an index card from the front table

      Ticket-Out-the-Door -- "The most important conclusion I drew today was..."
      --finish the sentence starter above in a specific fashion in no more than three to five sentences

      --LEAVE YOUR INDEX CARD ON YOUR DESK WHEN CLASS ENDS.  MAKE SURE TO WRITE YOUR NAME AT THE TOP OF THE LINED SIDE.

      HW (Class Preparation)
      --Vocabulary Quiz #5 will take place on Friday, 3/24.  If you have not trained the total number of minutes assigned since Vocabulary Quiz #4, please catch up between now and Friday.  Otherwise, you will not be permitted to take the quiz (see the “Membean Routine” document).
      --Aim to read at least 5-10 pages of your free reading book between now and next class (especially since we are not currently reading a novel together!).  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FINAL FREE READING BOOK OF THE SCHOOL YEAR TO CLASS!
      --The final novel assessment for LotF will take place next class (Wednesday, 3/22).  Review your purposeful/active reading notes and notes from the discussions that have occurred in class as preparation for the final novel assessment.  This assessment will consist of identification of significant passages (mirroring the “speed dating” activity and the exemplar shared in class today).  On the assessment, you will be held accountable for knowing and being able to apply the following concepts/terms:
      • allusion
      • atmosphere/mood
      • characterization
      • Christ(ological) figure
      • conflict
      • deus ex machina
      • diction
      • foreshadowing
      • geography
      • imagery
      • irony
      • juxtaposition
      • literary blindness
      • literary communion
      • literary vampire
      • marked for greatness
      • metaphor/simile
      • microcosm
      • monomyth (hero’s journey)
      • motif
      • plot
      • point of view
      • setting
      • symbolism
      • theme (e.g., fear, good and evil, human nature, loss of identity, loss of innocence, mob mentality, etc.)/theme statement (What about the aforementioned themes?)
      --Continue thinking about (and, quite frankly, consider beginning working on) the End-of-Course Assignment--you do not want to wait too long to get started on this!

      Monday, March 13, 2017

      English 9--3/16/2017 & 3/17/2017

      Jump Off (2-3 mins.)
      --Please pick up a copy of the "Defining Impulsiveness" document from the front table.  Purposefully read the directions and begin completing the task at hand quietly and independently.
      --Please SEE ME before the end of class today regarding the end of the marking period:
      • D. Domville
      • J. Futter
      • A. Hawker
      • H. LaFountain
      • E. Mohnkern
      • B. Robinson
      S. the C. (8-10 mins.)
      --You should leave class today with...
      • the ability to better define "impulsiveness"
      • a solid, supportable answer to each of these two questions:
        • What is Romeo like?
        • How do you know?
      • a number in mind on a scale of 1-10 (a "score", if you will) that corresponds with Romeo's level of impulsiveness by the end of Act I
        • an explanation of why, using specific details from the play, you are giving Romeo the score that you are
      • your "Romeo and Juliet Unit--Mini-Test--March 2017" completed (if it is not already)
      • , potentially, the Marking Period 3 and Marking Period 4 Free Reading Course Component completed
      • a clear sense of what to do between now and next class in order to continue moving forward.
      --agenda/HW
      Share-Out/Discussion/Note-taking -- Defining Impulsiveness (8-10 mins.)
      --directions clarified (if necessary)
      --quiet and independent work time (continued)
      --share-out via a drawing of cards--jot down the notes that end up on the front board on the back of your document (These are the notes that I will use to create a class definition for posting in the classroom/on the blog!)

      Transition (3-5 mins.)
      --Please pick up a copy of the "Purposeful Close Re-reading Questions--Act I, scene i, lines 152-230" document and the corresponding excerpt from the play from the front table.  Purposefully read the directions in order to answer these questions: What are you being asked to do?  What is the purpose of this task?
      • questions answered (cards drawn)
      • modeling with #1
      • partnerships formed via a drawing of cards
      Purposeful Close Re-reading (Share-Out/Discussion Preparation) -- Act I, scene i, lines 152-230 of The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet (10-ish mins.)

      --work with this section of the play in pairs as per the directions


      Transition (1-2 mins.)

      --Re-column the desks and pick up a copy of the class preparation assignment due next class ("Purposeful Re-reading--Act I, scene iii, lines 64-100").

      Share-Out/Discussion -- Act I, scene i, lines 152-230 of The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet (flex time)
      --as you and your peers share and I mark up the text on the SMART Board, do the same on your personal copy (volunteers first, then cards drawn)


      Assessment/"Assessment"/DEAR -- Romeo and Juliet Unit--Mini-Test--March 2017/Free Reading Books (last 40-45 mins. of class)--For the remainder of class, please complete one or more of the following tasks quietly and independently:
      • Finish your "Romeo and Juliet Unit--Mini-Test--March 2017" if you have yet to do so.
      • If you have already finished your free reading book for Marking Periods 3 and 4 but have yet to complete a one-pager, select and begin completing or continue completing a one-pager.
      • Work on your "book talk" (if you have decided to deliver a "book talk" instead of completing a one-pager).
      • Browse the classroom library (or the high school library) in search of the perfect book for the last 12 weeks of the school year.
      • Engage in free reading--reading Upfront newsmagazine (located on the front table) is appropriate.
      • Complete the class preparation assignment about Juliet's character due next class.
      HW (Class Preparation)
      --Finish anything that we are unable to complete during the first half of the class block (e.g., analyzing Romeo's character).
      --Consider re-reading and thinking about the "You should leave class today with..." in order to monitor your progress and move forward.
      --Complete the "Purposeful Re-reading--Act I, scene iii, lines 64-100" document to the best of your ability as per the directions by the beginning of next class (Monday, 3/20 [BDF] or Tuesday, 3/21 [ACE]).  This assignment is meant to both close out our work with Act I and help you craft your final essay.
      HW (Miscellaneous)
      --Work toward fulfillment of the Free Reading Course Component for Marking Periods 3 and 4 as per the parameters set forth in the document you received two classes ago.  Depending on your choice for this assignment, you have until either the end of the day today (Thursday, 3/16) or Friday, 3/17 to "take care of business".  IF YOU STILL NEED TO SELECT YOUR FINAL FREE READING BOOK OF THE SCHOOL YEAR, PLEASE DO SO ASAP--ALWAYS BRING A FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS!

      English 10 Honors--3/16/2017

      Jump Off -- Song Lyrics Revisited (3-5 mins.)
      --Pick up some Post-it Notes for today’s reading of the final chapter of Lord of the Flies.
      --Take out your Mumford and Sons annotated song lyrics from prior to our reading of LotF.  Now that you have nearly finished (or, perhaps, completely finished) the novel, quickly reread the lyrics.  Does anything else “stick out” now that didn’t before that could illuminate our discussions as we wrap up the novel?  Jot down additional annotations accordingly.
      --When you finish, please form an alphabetical-by-first-name circle out of the desks.  We are going to concurrently read, take notes about, and discuss CHAPTER TWELVE of LotF in the circle today.

      S. the C. (8-10 mins.)
      --agenda/HW
      --"Tell Me Something Good"
      --briefly discuss the Jump Off prior to oral reading of CHAPTER TWELVE

      Purposeful/Active Oral Reading and Discussion -- LotF CHAPTER TWELVE (flex time)
      --Reminder: Our purposeful/active reading tasks are as follows:
      • complete Post-its
        •  look for, draw potential conclusions about, and flag the items on our “What to Look for in Lord of the Flies” list
        • read actively as we have done in the past (e.g., if you have a question, jot it down and flag the page; if you connect the text to personal experience, jot down notes about the connection and flag the page; etc.)
      • complete the study guide as directed
      --purposeful/active reading tasks MODELED during oral reading of the first paragraph on page 183
      --oral reading continued/reading tasks completed
      • Every three pages or so, we will stop and engage in discussion--when discussion “peters out”, we will pick back up with oral reading!
      "Assessment"/DEAR -- Free Reading Books (last 30-35 mins. of class)
      --complete one-pagers
      --Students who have already completed one-pagers will do one of the following:

      • Continue reading CHAPTER TWELVE of LotF
      • Quietly look for a new novel-length work in our classroom library or at the high school library
      • Engage in free reading of a novel-length work
      • Engage in free reading of Upfront newsmagazine
      --When finished, turn in your one-pager and...

      • Continue reading CHAPTER TWELVE of LotF
      • quietly look for a new novel-length work in our classroom library or at the high school library
      • engage in free reading of a novel-length work
      • engage in free reading of Upfront newsmagazine.
      HW (Class Preparation)
      --Vocabulary Quiz #5 is postponed until next week.  If you have not trained the total number of minutes assigned since Vocabulary Quiz #4, please catch up between now and next class.  Otherwise, you will not be permitted to take the quiz on the day that it is scheduled (see the “Membean Routine” document).
      --One-pagers are due at the end of the day tomorrow (Friday, 3/17) for those of you who have yet to complete one.  
      --Consider selecting a free reading book for the last two marking periods that will in some way aid you in the completion of your End-of-Course Assignment.  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FINAL FREE READING BOOK OF THE SCHOOL YEAR TO CLASS!
      --Finish purposefully/actively reading CHAPTER TWELVE of LotF prior to next class.  Also, strongly consider reading "Notes on Lord of the Flies", a piece of literary criticism about the novel that begins on page 203.
      --The final novel assessment for LotF is scheduled for Wednesday, 3/22.  (Though the ideal day for this assessment is actually Monday, 3/20, I didn’t want to schedule the test for the first class day back following musical weekend [You’re welcome! :)].)  Review your purposeful/active reading notes and notes from the discussions that have occurred in class as preparation for the final novel assessment.  This assessment will consist of identification of significant passages (mirroring the “speed dating” activity that took place the past few classes).  On the assessment, you will be held accountable for knowing and being able to apply the following concepts/terms:
      • allusion
      • atmosphere/mood
      • characterization
      • Christ(ological) figure
      • conflict
      • deus ex machina
      • diction
      • foreshadowing
      • geography
      • imagery
      • irony
      • juxtaposition
      • literary blindness
      • literary communion
      • literary vampire
      • marked for greatness
      • metaphor/simile
      • microcosm
      • monomyth (hero’s journey)
      • motif
      • plot
      • point of view
      • setting
      • symbolism
      • theme (e.g., fear, good and evil, human nature, loss of identity, loss of innocence, mob mentality, etc.)/theme statement (What about the aforementioned themes?)

      Come to class next time with a list of discussion items/questions that we can use to continue moving forward as we wrap up the novel together.
      --Continue thinking about (and, quite frankly, consider beginning working on) the End-of-Course Assignment--you do not want to wait too long to get started on this!