Friday, October 31, 2014

English 9--11/5/2014 & 11/6/2014

Jump Off (10 mins.)
--Pick up a copy of the "Theme/Theme Statement Review" halfsheet from the corner of the side table located by the door.  After mindfully reading the directions, complete the task at hand quietly and independently.  Good luck!

S. the C. (15-20 mins.)
--You should leave class today with:
  • a deeper understanding of theme in literature, as we will review via the five focus questions below:
    • What is a theme?
    • How can a reader determine what themes exist in a text?
    • What is a theme statement?
    • How does a mere theme differ from a theme statement?
    • How can a reader turn a theme into a theme statement?
  • a better idea of the various insights into the human condition (theme statements) author Karen Russell attempts to convey in "St. Lucy's..."
  • a revised theme statement for Karen Russell's "St. Lucy's..." or the ability to revise your current rough theme statement
  • the Quarter 1 Free Reading Course Component completed or almost completed
--agenda/HW
--share-out as per the Jump Off

Application/Looking Ahead Activity -- Theme Statement Analysis (20-25 mins.)
--write your theme statement from the homework assignment due today on either the chalkboard or the whiteboard.  Keep in mind that we have 24 students, so choose an appropriate font size!
--take a look at the "Theme Statements--The Dos and The Do Nots PowerPoint
--analyze/revise some theme statements together based on our collective knowledge from last class and today--roughly support some theme statements as well, perhaps?
 
Transition (as quickly as possible!)
--two sample one-pagers shared--which of the two is more effective and why?
--quick overview of the one-pager options
--pick up a one-pager from the table if you have yet to complete one

"Assessment"/DEAR -- Free Reading Books (remainder of class)
--students without books who have already completed one-pagers will read Upfront Magazine

HW
--Come to class next time with a stronger theme statement for Karen Russell's "St. Lucy's..." than you had at the start of class today.  SEE ME IF YOU WOULD LIKE A COPY OF THE POWERPOINT SLIDES FROM TODAY'S ACTIVITY.
--One-pagers are due at the end of the day on Friday (11/7/2014) for ALL students.  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS.  We will use some class time soon to pick out free reading books for Quarter 2!
--Article-of-the-Week will return next week (November 10th-November 14th)!

Backburner Goals (Mr. Martin's Note-to-Self):
  • Revisit methods for finding key details in nonfiction (use notes from last class later in school year)
  • Review the parts of speech as introduction to our grammar work/in order to aid in vocabulary study

English 10 Honors--11/5/2014

Jump Off
--On your desk, you will find both your grammar quiz from two classes ago and your exit ticket from last class.  Both of these items have to do with punctuation of restrictive and nonrestrictive elements.  We will spend the first portion of today's class block using these items in order to deepen our collective understanding of proper punctuation. 

S. the C.
--agenda/HW
--go over both the grammar quiz and sample exit tickets via SMART Notebook
**If you received a score lower than 70% on the grammar quiz last week, you must take a re-quiz before the end of the day next Friday (November 14th)--make arrangements with me ASAP--additional preparation materials are located on the shelf next to the door above the “Grammar Hammer Extras” sign**
--list of students needing to revise for the Cumulative Writing Portfolio shared--would anyone like to schedule a meeting for a time slot during my Office Hours?

Transition
--Pick up the "The Alchemist Active/Purposeful Reading Assessment--pgs. 1-47" from the front table.  After purposefully reading the directions and prompt, complete the task at hand.  You must submit your work at the end of the class block.  Good luck!

Assessment -- The Alchemist Active/Purposeful Reading Assessment--pgs. 1-47
--If you finish before the end of the class block, submit your work and either read your free reading book or work on homework.

DEAR/HW Time

HW
--The due date for completing a grammar requiz for restrictive and nonrestrictive elements is November 14th (a little over a week from today).  Please make arrangements with me ASAP.
--The due date for submitting a revised Thematic Writing Assignment--Partner Interviews essay for the Cumulative Writing Portfolio is November 17th (approximately 1.5 weeks from today)--YOU MUST schedule a meeting with me to go over your revisions; simply handing in the revisions is unacceptable as per the protocol. When time permits, meetings can/will occur during class time.
--Actively/purposefully read up to the page break on page 87 of The Alchemist by the beginning of next class. (See me if you need more Post-it Notes.) Expect to engage in discussion about your thoughts, ideas, questions, etc. in the future.  I reserve the right to conduct a reading assessment at any time--prepare accordingly!
--If you are not "feeling good" about your active/purposeful reading abilities (e.g., tracking Foster's "List of 18", applying the terms from last class block to the novella, etc.), consider the following tips:

What to put on Post-its:
ü  “Ah-ha!” moments
ü  Clarification of confusing aspects
ü  Connections to other readings, personal experience, etc.
ü  Favorite lines, sections, etc.
ü  General comments
ü  Notes about the author’s style
ü  Predictions
ü  Questions
ü  Recognition of literary elements (e.g., flashback, irony, symbolism, etc.) in action
ü  Unfamiliar words/allusions (and their definitions/origins once you’ve looked them up!)
ü  Visualizations
CONSIDERING AUTHORIAL PURPOSE IS KEY!

--Article-of-the-Week will return next week (November 10th-November 14th)!
--Bring your vocabulary book next time just in case we need it.  Please do not forget!
--Don't forget about your free reading book. ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS.

Backburner:
  • hand out end-of-unit writing assignment (clarity in terms of where we’re headed)

English 9--11/3/2014 & 11/4/2014

Jump Off
--Pick up an index card from the front table.  Then, back at your desk, read the information next to the bullet below and complete the task at hand quietly and independently.
  • The discussions that occurred last class led me to the conclusion that most of you were able to determine Claudette's general tone at the beginning of Stage 4 of "St. Lucy's..."  Some of you claimed that Claudette has a depressed tone or a sad tone or a disgusted tone.  An understanding of Claudette's tone should allow you to answer the following question--please do so on your index card, and be prepared to share your ideas and the specific pieces of text that back up your ideas in a few minutes:
How does Claudette truly feel about St. Lucy's as an institution?  Consider St. Lucy's objectives, Claudette's experiences and observations, and the way that Claudette depicts the events that she recounts in the story.
*AS YOU WORK, I WILL COME AROUND AND RETURN YOUR "TONE ANALYSIS TICKET-OUT-THE-DOOR" DOCUMENTS FROM THE END OF LAST CLASS--COMPARE YOUR WORK TO THE EXEMPLARS SHARED DURING THE "S. THE C." PORTION OF THE AGENDA*

S. the C.

--You should leave class today with:
  • a solid grasp of what tone is and how readers can determine tone
  • an understanding of how an author's or speaker's or character's tone impacts an author's work on the whole
  • a deeper understanding of theme in literature, as evidenced by your ability to answer the five focus questions below:
    • What is a theme?
    • How can a reader determine what themes exist in a text?
    • What is a theme statement?
    • How does a mere theme differ from a theme statement?
    • How can a reader turn a theme into a theme statement?
  • a rough idea of what insights into the human condition (theme statements) author Karen Russell attempts to convey in "St. Lucy's..."--THIS OBJECTIVE WILL BE ASSESSED AT THE END OF CLASS/NEXT CLASS VIA THE THEME STATEMENT-RELATED HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT
--T-O-D exemplars shared from last class
--quick share-out as per the Jump Off--today's class is very much an RL.2-driven lesson, but understanding tone (RL.4) will come in handy!
--agenda/HW

Transition -- open your notebook and date the page--label this section of your notes The Gist of "The Best Nest"

Notetaking/Application Activity -- Themes, Theme Statements, and Strong and Thorough Textual Evidence
--view "The Best Nest" on YouTube (based on a children's book by P.D. Eastman)--jot down notes encompassing the gist of the story, which we will then refer back to when we go through the theme notes during the next part of class

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7f6TsHA0kTM

--Transition--pick up the "'St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves' Mini-Unit--Theme Notes (RL.2)" page from the front table
--read through the top half of the notes page together, referring back to "The Best Nest" as a base of examples--annotate and/or copy t-chart from front board into your notebook!
--independent work--"St. Lucy's..." emergent themes brainstorming
--share out
--directions on back of page read/clarified (if necessary)

Closure/HW Time
--mindfully complete the back of the theme notes page (gather strong and thorough textual evidence from and develop a rough theme statement for "St. Lucy's...")--when and if you finish, I will take a look!

DEAR -- Free Reading Books (remainder of class [time permitting])

--students without books will read Upfront Magazine

HW
--Come to class next time with a rough theme statement written on the back of your "Theme Notes (RL.2)" page. Be prepared to share your theme statement with your classmates and me.
--Read your free reading book for at least 15 minutes between now and next class. Your book must be finished by THE END OF THIS WEEK!  One-pagers are due at the end of the day on Friday (11/7/2014) for ALL students, and you will have some class time next time to select and work on a one-pager if you have yet to complete this portion of the free reading component. ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS.
--Bring your vocabulary book next time just in case we need it. Please do not forget!
--Article-of-the-Week will return next week (November 10th-November 14th)!

Backburner Goals (Mr. Martin's Note-to-Self):
  • Revisit methods for finding key details in nonfiction (use notes from last class later in school year)
  • Review the parts of speech as introduction to our grammar work/in order to aid in vocabulary study

English 10 Honors--11/3/2014

Jump Off
--Take out your notebook and open it to the "Terms/Concepts/Tips--A Running List" section.  Then, write down each of the following terms/concepts, skipping about five lines after each item.
  • aphorism
  • dilemma
  • fable
  • foil
  • genre
  • interior monologue
  • leitmotif
  • magical realism
  • monomyth (hero's journey)
  • motif
  • myth
  • quest
*AS YOU WRITE, I WILL COME AROUND AND RETURN YOUR AOW #6 WRITTEN RESPONSES.  PLEASE NOTE THAT I SCORED YOUR WORK BASED ON “CONTENT AND ANALYSIS”.  SKIM BACK THROUGH YOUR WORK IN ORDER TO REMIND YOURSELF WHAT YOU WROTE--I WOULD LIKE TO BRIEFLY WRAP UP THIS ARTICLE AS PART OF TODAY'S CIRCLE DISCUSSION.*

S. the C.

--During today's discussion, we will continue working on:

  • citing strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • participating effectively in a collaborative discussion, building on others' ideas and expressing our own clearly and persuasively. This includes:
    • coming to the discussion prepared, having read and researched the material under study and explicitly drawing on that preparation by referring to evidence from the text (as noted above) and additional reading/research to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
    • propelling conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporating others into the discussion; and clarifying, verifying, or challenging ideas and conclusions.
    • responding thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarizing points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualifying or justifying our own views and understanding and making new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.
    • THIS MULTI-PART STANDARD WILL BE ASSESSED TODAY VIA THE "DISCUSSION CONTRIBUTION RATING SCALE."
--During today's discussion of The Alchemist, depending on "what comes up" from the text, we will also potentially work on:


  • determining a theme or central idea of a text and analyzing in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details.
  • analyzing how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations)      develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • determining the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyzing the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).
  • analyzing how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
--agenda/HW
--list of students needing to revise for the Cumulative Writing Portfolio shared--would anyone like to schedule a meeting for a time slot during my Office Hours?

Transition

--Take out your copy of Paulo Coelho’s The Alchemist. Spend a few minutes reviewing your purposeful Post-its completed in preparation for class three blocks ago. What can you contribute to today’s discussion?
  • For example, as an individual tasked to analyze theme in the beginning of the novella, I might share the following information:
    • I noticed that Paulo Coelho starts off with a Prologue retelling the story of Narcissus. I know that this myth typically ends with Narcissus drowning due to his obsession with his own beauty, but in Coelho’s retelling, the following text exists in the conclusion on page x: “‘I weep for Narcissus, but I never noticed that Narcissus was beautiful. I weep because, each time he knelt beside my banks, I could see, in the depths of his eyes, my own beauty reflected.’” I am wondering what Coelho is up to beginning the novella with this “twisted” retelling. Is this the emergence of “selfishness” as a theme?Is this meant to suggest that not only is Narcissus, well, narcissistic, but so is the lake and, therefore, all of nature, humanity, existence, etc.? However, the sentence following the one I just shared says, “‘What a lovely story,’ the alchemist thought.” Why is a story perhaps about “selfishness,” a quality that typically connotes negatively, thought of as “lovely” by the title character? Will Coelho convey some sort of big idea about selfishness as a positive quality? I must attempt to track this throughout the novella!
--form an alphabetical-by-street-name-on-which-you-currently-live circle out of the desks in no more than 2 MINUTES

Circle Discussion -- Article-of-the-Week #6 & Applying Foster's Work to Coelho's Work
--discuss interpretations of Business First rankings
--draw connections between Foster's "list of 18" and the beginning of Coelho's novel/closely read the beginning of The Alchemist

Transition -- re-column the desks

Closure -- Today, I learned...

--Write your name on a scrap of paper.
--Directions: Reflect back upon today's class. Then, complete the sentence-starter above by writing a few specific sentences. Somewhere within what you write, you must properly punctuate/use a nonrestrictive element. Feel free to consult any helpful materials from last week.
--When finished, submit your work.

HW

--Find quality definitions for each of the terms/concepts copied into your notes today during the Jump Off. Consider consulting the following websites:
  • https://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/lit_terms.html
  • http://www.wwnorton.com/college/english/nawol3/literaryterms.aspx
After reading a definition for a term/concept, write the definition in your notes in your own words.  Henceforth, you are expected to both understand these terms/concepts and apply your understandings as part of your active/purposeful reading of Paulo Coelho's The Alchemist.
--Actively/purposefully read up to the end of page 47 of The Alchemist by the beginning of next class.  (See me if you need more Post-it Notes.)  Expect to engage in discussion about your thoughts, ideas, questions, etc.
--Expect an assessment of your knowledge and understanding regarding Paulo Coelho's The Alchemist soon (perhaps next class?). Consider the concepts that we have discussed in our circles/small-group discussions and the suggestions for active/purposeful reading. What are some logical questions/prompts that I could use for assessment purposes?
--Article-of-the-Week will return next week (November 10th-November 14th)!
--The due date for submitting a revised Thematic Writing Assignment--Partner Interviews essay for the Cumulative Writing Portfolio is November 17th (two weeks from today)--YOU MUST schedule a meeting with me to go over your revisions; simply handing in the revisions is unacceptable as per the protocol. When time permits, meetings can/will occur during class time.
--Bring your vocabulary book next time just in case we need it. Please do not forget!
--Don't forget about your free reading book.  ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS.


Backburner:
  • hand out end-of-unit writing assignment (clarity in terms of where we’re headed)

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

English 9--10/30/2014 & 10/31/2014

Jump Off (5-8 mins.)
--Take out your "Learning Standards" and "Learning Standards--Unit Items and Progress Self-Assessment" documents.  Then, complete the following tasks quietly and independently. 
  • Thinking back to what we accomplished over the course of the past few classes, mindfully fill in/add to some rows of the “What Have We Done?” and “How Am I Doing?” columns.  You should focus especially on the W.2, W.4, W.5, and W.9 rows.  I actually plan on calling on a few of you later in the block to share your reflections--just an FYI!
  • Reread RL.4 on your "Learning Standards" document, focusing especially on "analyze...tone".  What do you think this section of the standard means?
  • Take out your personal copy of “St. Lucy’s...”

S. the C. (8-10 mins.)
--quick share-out as per the Jump Off--today's class is very much an RL.4-driven lesson
--today's class also presents an opportunity to apply standard SL.1 by aiming to participate effectively in a collaborative discussion--you will likely pose and respond to questions, incorporate each other into the discussion, and challenge/verify each other's ideas and conclusions
--agenda/HW
 
Transition (5-10 mins.)
--Pick up a copy of the "Tone Analysis Questions for the Beginning of Stage 4 (RL.4)" document from the front table.  Back at your desk, purposefully read the directions, the information in the table, and the twelve questions quietly and independently.
  • Q & A
  • I will model one response--majority rules!

Pair Work/Discussion -- “St. Lucy’s…”--Tone Analysis for the Beginning of Stage 4 (40-45 mins. total)
--mindfully complete the task at hand quietly and independently (10 mins.)
--Transition--form partnerships and continue working (10-15 mins.)
--Transition--recolumn the desks/return to assigned seats (2 mins.)
--share out/discuss (cards drawn if necessary)--as I mark up the text on the SmartBoard, do the same on your personal copy of the text (15-20 mins.)

Transition (5-8 mins.)
--Pick up the "Tone Analysis Ticket-Out-the-Door" from the front table.  Complete the exit ticket quietly and independently and place your work in the black basket on the front table when you are finished.

DEAR -- Free Reading Books (remainder of class [time permitting])
--students without books will read Upfront Magazine

HW
--Read back through your responses to the questions/prompts in the "Tone Analysis Questions for the Beginning of Stage 4 (RL.4)" document, making sure to respond to any questions/prompts that are currently blank.
--Read your free reading book for at least 15 minutes between now and next class. Your book must be finished by early-November. ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS.
--Bring your vocabulary book next time just in case we need it.  Please do not forget!
--Enjoy the weekend--you only get so many of 'em!

Backburner Goals (Mr. Martin's Note-to-Self):
  • Revisit methods for finding key details in nonfiction (use notes from last class later in school year)
  • Review the parts of speech as introduction to our grammar work/in order to aid in vocabulary study

English 10 Honors--10/30/2014

Jump Off (3 min.)
--Take out your homework assignment (PRACTICE located in the "Common Error: Missing comma[s] with a nonrestrictive element" document) and scan back through your work.  We will begin class today by going over this assignment.

S. the C. (5-8 mins.)
--agenda/HW

Review -- "Missing comma(s) with a nonrestrictive element" (5-8 mins.)
--homework answers shared

Transition -- pick up the quiz from the front table (1 min.)

Assessment -- "QUIZ--Restrictive elements/Non-restrictive elements" (8-10 mins.)
--complete the quiz quietly and independently
--When you finish with the quiz, place your work in the black basket on the front table and begin preparing for discussion.

Transition (3-5 mins.)
--Take out your copy of Paulo Coelho’s The Alchemist. Spend a few minutes reviewing your purposeful Post-its completed in preparation for class two blocks ago.  What can you contribute to today’s discussion?
  • For example, as an individual tasked to analyze theme in the beginning of the novella, I might share the following information:
    • I noticed that Paulo Coelho starts off with a Prologue retelling the story of Narcissus.  I know that this myth typically ends with Narcissus drowning due to his obsession with his own beauty, but in Coelho’s retelling, the following text exists in the conclusion on page x: “‘I weep for Narcissus, but I never noticed that Narcissus was beautiful.  I weep because, each time he knelt beside my banks, I could see, in the depths of his eyes, my own beauty reflected.’”  I am wondering what Coelho is up to beginning the novella with this “twisted” retelling.  Is this the emergence of “selfishness” as a theme?  Is this meant to suggest that not only is Narcissus, well, narcissistic, but so is the lake and, therefore, all of nature, humanity, existence, etc.?  However, the sentence following the one I just shared says, “‘What a lovely story,’ the alchemist thought.”  Why is a story perhaps about “selfishness,” a quality that typically connotes negatively, thought of as “lovely” by the title character?  Will Coelho convey some sort of big idea about selfishness as a positive quality?  I must attempt to track this throughout the novella!
--Place students in the following discussion groups:

  • Emily B., Clarissa H., and Sara O.
  • Danielle B., Billy H., and Casey P.
  • Josh B., Sarah H., and Riley S.
  • Nick C., Claudia K., and Michelle T.
  • Madi D., Franz L., and Hannah T.
  • Skyler E., Ronald L., and Nick V.
  • Donald F., Conor M., and Audrey W.
Small-Group Discussions -- Applying Foster's Work to Coelho's Work (remainder of time prior to going to the library)
--draw connections between Foster's "list of 18" and the beginning of Coelho's novel/closely read the beginning of The Alchemist

LIBRARY

HW
--The due date for submitting a revised Thematic Writing Assignment--Partner Interviews essay for the Cumulative Writing Portfolio is November 17th (approximately 2.5 weeks from today)--YOU MUST schedule a meeting with me to go over your revisions; simply handing in the revisions is unacceptable as per the protocol. When time permits, meetings can/will occur during class time.
--Expect an assessment of your knowledge and understanding regarding the exposition of Paulo Coelho's The Alchemist soon. Consider the concepts that we have discussed in our circles/small-group discussions. What are some logical questions/prompts that I could use for assessment purposes?
--Bring your vocabulary book next time just in case we need it.  Please do not forget!
--Try to carve out some time between now and next class to read your free reading book for at least 15 minutes. ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS.
--Enjoy the weekend—you only get so many of ‘em!

Backburner:
  • hand out end-of-unit writing assignment (clarity in terms of where we’re headed)

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

English 9--10/28/2014 & 10/29/2014

Jump Off
--Pick up the "Mid-Mini-Unit Assessment/Writing Assignment" document from the front table.  Also, take out any materials that you have that will help you complete today's writing task (e.g., your copy of "St. Lucy's...", your writing packet, an outline, etc.).
--Find your name card and sit in the corresponding desk.  (The cards are alphabetized.)
 
S. the C. 
--agenda/HW
  • information written on chalkboard and mini-whiteboard pointed out (notes about organization and parenthetical references)

Assessment/On-Demand Writing -- "St. Lucy's Home for Girls Raised by Wolves" Mini-Unit Mid-Mini-Unit Assessment/Writing Assignment
--complete the assessment/writing assignment quietly and independenlty--good luck!
--When you finish your best work, place your document in the black basket on the front table.  Engage in free reading for the remainder of the class block.

HW
--Read your free reading book for at least 15 minutes between now and next class. Your book must be finished by early-November. ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS.

Backburner Goals (Mr. Martin's Note-to-Self):
  • Revisit methods for finding key details in nonfiction (use notes from last class later in school year)
  • Review the parts of speech as introduction to our grammar work/in order to aid in vocabulary study

English 10 Honors--10/28/2014

Jump Off
--Pick up a copy of the document titled "ENGLISH TEST" from the front table. Complete the test quietly and independently. As you complete the test, make a list (perhaps in the margin?) of what you need to know in order to complete each "question." (For example, for #1, you need to know comma rules and how both the semicolon and long dash function.) Good luck!
*AS YOU WORK, I WILL COME AROUND AND RETURN YOUR AOW #3 WRITTEN RESPONSES.  PLEASE NOTE THAT I SCORED YOUR WORK BASED ON “CONTROL OF CONVENTIONS” (WHICH IS WHY YOU ARE GETTING YOUR WORK BACK ON A “GRAMMAR HAMMER” DAY!).  THE NUMBERS UNDER “Error Key” ON YOUR DOCUMENT CORRESPOND WITH THE LIST THAT I WILL PROJECT UP FRONT MOMENTARILY.*

S. the C.
--Today, we will generally work on:

  • demonstrating command of the conventions of standard English grammar, usage, and punctuation.
  • applying knowledge of language to make effective choices for meaning or style.
  • strengthening writing as needed by editing or trying a new approach.
  • THESE STANDARDS WILL BE SELF-ASSESSED VIA YOUR PERFORMANCE ON THE "ENGLISH TEST". ALSO, PLEASE NOTE YOUR PERFORMANCE ON YOUR AOW #3 WRITTEN RESPONSE. DO YOU SEE THE CONNECTION BETWEEN TODAY'S WORK AND YOUR CWP REVISIONS?
--Today, we will specifically work on:

  • using punctuation (commas, parentheses, dashes) to set off nonrestrictive/parenthetical elements. THIS STANDARD WILL BE ASSESSED VIA THE TICKET-OUT-THE-DOOR. ADDITIONALLY, THIS STANDARD WILL BE PRACTICED AS HOMEWORK AND ASSESSED NEXT CLASS VIA A QUIZ.
--During today's discussion, we will continue working on:

  • citing strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • participating effectively in a collaborative discussion, building on others' ideas and expressing our own clearly and persuasively. This includes:
    • coming to the discussion prepared, having read and researched the material under study and explicitly drawing on that preparation by referring to evidence from the text (as noted above) and additional reading/research to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
    • propelling conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporating others into the discussion; and clarifying, verifying, or challenging ideas and conclusions.
    • responding thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarizing points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualifying or justifying our own views and understanding and making new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.
    • THIS MULTI-PART STANDARD WILL BE ASSESSED TODAY VIA THE "DISCUSSION CONTRIBUTION RATING SCALE."
--During today's discussion, depending on "what comes up" from the text, we will also potentially work on:

  • determining a theme or central idea of a text and analyzing in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details.
  • analyzing how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
  • determining the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyzing the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).
  • analyzing how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
--agenda/HW
--list of students needing to revise for the Cumulative Writing Portfolio shared--would anyone like to schedule a meeting for a time slot during my Office Hours?
--go over the J.O. (portion of an ACT English Test) question-by-question--arrive at an answer for each, create list of "need to knows", analyze the list of "need to knows" (what is really/mostly tested?), determine a score, contextualize your score via the information written up on the front board, etc.
--rationale for next portion of the agenda--I can help (and you, of course, can help yourself)!!!

Transition
--After a ceremonial dropping of the grammar hammer, pick up a copy of the "Missing comma(s) with a nonrestrictive element" document from the front table. We will purposefully read through the top two thirds of the first page of this grammar hammer document together.

Instruction -- Missing comma(s) with a nonrestrictive element
--purposeful reading
--For HW, mindfully complete the PRACTICE. Also, if you feel it is necessary, read through the packet of additional information pertaining to this error and complete PRACTICE #4 (located in a manila folder in the "Grammar Hammer Extras" area of the classroom). These instructional materials and practices are meant to help you master the fourth standard listed in today's agenda. A quiz about this error will take place next class.

Transition
--discussion protocol/"Discussion Contribution Rating Scale" reminder
--3 vs. 4 modeling
--Take out your copy of Paulo Coelho’s The Alchemist. Spend a few minutes reviewing your purposeful Post-its completed in preparation for last class. What can you contribute to today’s discussion?
--form an alphabetical-by-street-name-on-which-you-currently-live circle out of the desks in no more than 2 MINUTES


Circle Discussion -- Applying Foster's Work to Coelho's Work
--draw connections between Foster's "list of 18" and the beginning of Coelho's novel/closely read the beginning of The Alchemist

Transition -- re-column the desks

Closure -- Today, I learned...
--Write your name on a scrap of paper.
--Directions: Reflect back upon today's class. Then, complete the sentence-starter above by writing a few specific sentences. Somewhere within what you write, you must properly punctuate/use a nonrestrictive element. Feel free to consult any helpful materials from today's class.
--When finished, submit your work.

HW
--The due date for submitting a revised Thematic Writing Assignment--Partner Interviews essay for the Cumulative Writing Portfolio is November 17th (just under three weeks from today)--YOU MUST schedule a meeting with me to go over your revisions; simply handing in the revisions is unacceptable as per the protocol. When time permits, meetings can/will occur during class time.
--Mindfully complete the PRACTICE located in today's grammar hammer document. Also, if you feel it is necessary, read through the packet of additional information pertaining to this error and complete PRACTICE #4 (located in a manila folder in the "Grammar Hammer Extras" area of the classroom). These instructional materials and practices are meant to help you master the fourth standard listed in today's agenda. A quiz about this error will take place next class.  MAKE SURE TO PICK UP THE NECESSARY MATERIALS FROM THE FRONT TABLE OF THE CLASSROOM IF YOU DID NOT DO SO AT THE END OF CLASS TODAY!
--Expect an assessment of your knowledge and understanding regarding the exposition of Paulo Coelho's The Alchemist soon.  Consider the concepts that we have discussed in our circles.  What are some logical questions/prompts that I could use for assessment purposes?
--FYI: This was the question: According to Thomas C. Foster, "every novel wants to be read in a certain way." This phrase presents the idea that once a reader has read 10 or so pages of a novel, he or she will have a sense of what to look for/how to annotate and "converse" with the text moving forward. Having now read and discussed the beginning of Paulo Coelho's The Alchemist, what is one "thing" that you are now looking for as you continue reading? These are the responses:

  • characterization and character development
  • irony
  • theme (e.g., "dreams", "paths", "destinations", "challenges", "growth", "religion", etc.)
  • narrative presence
  • comparisons (in the form of allusions, metaphors (extended or otherwise), symbols, etc.)
  • Santiago as a Christological figure
  • justification for any claims about the text, author's purpose, etc.
--Try to carve out some time between now and next class to read your free reading book for at least 15 minutes. ALWAYS BRING YOUR FREE READING BOOK TO CLASS.
Backburner:
  • hand out end-of-unit writing assignment (clarity in terms of where we’re headed)